Terrence Henry

Reporter, StateImpact Texas

Terrence Henry is a Senior Reporter at KUT and StateImpact Texas. He has worked as an editor, writer and web producer for The Washington Post and The Atlantic. He has a bachelor’s degree in International Relations from Brigham Young University.

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Transportation
9:09 am
Fri December 21, 2012

Headed to the Airport? Get There Early

Passenger traffic is up this year at ABIA, and this year's holiday traffic is no exception.
Credit Photo by Mose Buchele/KUT News

If you're headed on a flight out of Austin today, you may want to heed official advice and get there 90 minutes early. Or maybe even a little earlier than that.

KUT's own Mose Buchele, a reporter for StateImpact Texas, sent us the photo above from the airport early this morning, well before the day's flight schedule had peaked. And it's only expected to get busier throughout the day. 

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2012 Election
11:58 pm
Tue November 6, 2012

Pete Gallego Defeats Fransciso 'Quico' Canseco in CD-23

Democrat Pete Gallego has ousted a Republican incumbent in a West Texas house race.
Texas Tribune

Republican incumbent Rep. Francisco "Quico" Canseco, R-San Antonio, was defeated by challenger state Rep. Pete Gallego, D-Alpine, for the 23rd congressional district, according to projections by the Texas Tribune. The district encompasses much of far West Texas, from San Antonio to El Paso along the border. With 82 percent of precincts reporting, Gallego has fifty percent of the vote to Canseco's 46 percent. 

The race was among just a handful of competitive races for congressional seats in Texas this fall, along with Republican Randy Weber’s race against Democrat Pete Lampson for the 10th congressional district.

Canseco was a Tea Party candidate who won office two years ago, but lost re-election to Gallego, who has served in the state legislature for 22 years.

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2012 Election
11:27 pm
Tue November 6, 2012

Randy Weber Defeats Nick Lampson in CD-14

Randy Weber won Ron Paul's congressional seat in Southeast Texas.
randyweber.org

Randy Weber, a Republican state representative from Pearland, defeated former Democratic congressman Nick Lampson in the race to replace Congressman Ron Paul in the 14th Congressional District. With 51 percent of precincts reporting, KUT's political reporting partner Texas Tribune has called the race for Weber. 

CD-14 is in Southeast Texas, running from outside of Houston to the outskirts of Corpus Christi along the Gulf Coast. It was one of the few competitive congressional races in the state this year. The seat came open after Ron Paul, a former presidential Republican primary candidate, decided not to seek re-election.

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2012 Election
11:05 pm
Tue November 6, 2012

Wendy Davis Narrowly Defeats Mark Shelton in SD-10

State Sen. Wendy Davis (D) has narrowly held on to her seat.
davis.senate.state.tx.us

In what was considered the only real race on the ballot for the Texas Senate, Democratic incumbent Wendy Davis managed to eke out a victory over Republican Mark Shelton for the state senate seat in District 10, according to projections by the Texas Tribune. The two were vying for what is demographically Republican district, but has been held by the Democrat Davis since 2008.

With 93 percent of precincts reporting, Davis had 51 percent of the vote.

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Texas
7:07 am
Fri November 2, 2012

La Niña Could Bring More Drought to Texas

Daniel Reese for KUT News

After the brutal drought of 2011, welcome rains this year put minds at ease in many parts of Texas. But any respite may be short-lived.

The best hope Texas had for a full recovery from its long drought was a wet upcoming winter. But recent weather models show that’s growing less and less likely. The reason? The El Niño weather pattern meteorologists expected is not forming in the Atlantic.

State Climatologist John Neilsen-Gammon tell StateImpact Texas the bad news doesn’t end there.

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Austin
11:42 am
Fri September 14, 2012

Confusion and Uncertainty Amid UT’s Mass Evacuation

Students and faculty evacuate the UT campus Friday morning.
Photo by Filipa Rodrigues/KUT News

The UT campus was a scene of confusion today after a bomb threat led to an evacuation of all University buildings. Students and staff flooded nearby streets and coffee shops quickly became standing room only as Longhorns waited to hear from the University about whether the campus was safe and classes would resume.

Initially, details were sketchy. Sirens sounded around ten minutes to ten, around the same time an alert went out on the University’s emergency notification bulletin, which sends out text alerts:

“Evacuation due to threats on campus. Immediately evacuate ALL buildings and get as far away as possible. More information to come.”

That information would not be updated on the UT website for well over an hour.

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Politics
11:15 pm
Tue July 31, 2012

Smitherman, Craddick Win Primary Runoff for Railroad Commission

Barry Smitherman won the Republican primary runoff for his seat on the Railroad Commission of Texas.

There weren’t any real surprises in tonight’s Republican primary runoff for two of the seats on the Railroad Commission of Texas. That’s the state agency in charge of regulating the oil and gas industry in Texas.

Incumbent chair Barry Smitherman won another turn at his seat after beating challenger Greg Parker. In the runoff for the open seat on the commission, Christi Craddick won over State Representative Warren Chisum.

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Arts and Culture
9:59 am
Tue May 1, 2012

What Makes Austin's Food Scene Great: A Conversation with Andrew Zimmern

Andrew Zimmern says the best part of Austin's food scene is the diners.
Photo courtesy of Austin Food & Wine Festival

Andrew Zimmern, the host of Travel Channel's Bizarre Foods (where he's made a name for himself eating exotic things like fermented beetle anus), heaped some praise on the local food scene at the Austin Food Festival this weekend. But while Zimmern is fond of many Austin chefs, farmers and restaurants, he saves the highest praise for Austinites themselves.

KUT: So tell us why you're here at this food festival in Austin.

Andrew Zimmern: "I think Austin has a very special food community in terms of diners. It's the diners and the Austinites that have created the atmosphere for all this amazing food here to flourish.

Every single person I've spoken to here at this festival, I think, gets it all wrong about Austin. Everybody puts the food and chefs first, and I think it's not chicken or egg, it's very matter-of-fact: the audience here in Austin is unique. They are willing to be experimented at, and they do not hold grudges against chefs that make mistakes or have failures, as long as that chef is willing to get back on their bicycle and start pedaling again.

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Austin
12:13 pm
Mon April 30, 2012

Love and Dust: Scenes From the Austin Food and Wine Fest

The scene at Auditorium Shores this weekend.
Photo by Filipa Rodrigues for KUT News

Thousands of gourmets and tipplers gathered at the Austin Food and Wine Festival this weekend. 

There was, of course, wine, but there was also sushi, macaroons and even Frito pie. And there was a scene you’ll have a hard time finding again: 200 charcoal grills all fired up at once on the shores of Lady Bird Lake. The coals were burning for Fort Worth chef Tim Love's "Grills Gone Wild" hands-on demo, where attendees learned the art of searing, resting and slicing a steak.

"Now I cook them medium rare. Cause I’m an American. Not only am I an American, I’m a ... Texan. So remember that," Love said as he whipped up the crowd. 

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food and wine festival
10:47 am
Sat April 28, 2012

First Austin Food & Wine Festival Gets Cooking

Gail Simmons says Austin is bursting with creativity.
Photo courtesy Austin Food & Wine Festival

Austin’s long been known as the Live Music Capital of the World. But these days the city’s also on the map for its food scene.  Today the first Austin Food and Wine festival kicks off at Auditorium shores. We sat down with Gail Simmons, a judge on Top Chef and a figure at Food and Wine magazine, about what’s on tap at the festival and why they chose Austin in the first place. 

KUT: What was it about Austin that attracted you and the festival here?

Gail Simmons: "Interestingly, I think both art and craft in Austin are alive and well. It's a young, energetic city, obviously partially because of the huge student culture here. And it's just full of great art and great design and great music. And it only makes sense that food would follow.

Over the last several years, we've seen a huge surge in great, creative young talent in the food world. There's been some great young chefs coming out of Texas, notably Tyson Cole at Uchi and Bryce Gilmore at Barley Swine just a year or two ago. Those are only two of them, certainly. But there seems to be a great energy here, a great mix of cultures and cuisines creating this signature style that Austin is really known for now.

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Top News
8:00 am
Sun December 11, 2011

Top Morning Stories 12/11/11: Baylor QB Wins Heisman; Candidates Debate in Iowa; New Coach at A&M

Texas Governor Rick Perry debated other GOP hopefuls last night in Iowa
Photo by Daniel Reese/KUT News

Baylor Bear Wins the Heisman

In a first for the university, Baylor quarterback Robert Griffin III was awarded the Heisman trophy Saturday, an annual recognition of the most outstanding player in college football.  The closest Baylor has come to being the home of a Heisman winner was 48 years ago, when a player came in fourth, according to the Associated Press.  

"This is unbelievably believable,'' Griffin said after receiving the award. "It's unbelievable because in the moment we're all amazed when great things happen. But it's believable because great things don't happen without hard work."

Here's Griffin's official highlight reel.

Perry Has Strong Debate, But Focus Stays on Gingrich

Texas Governor Rick Perry had one of his strongest debate performances yet Saturday night in Iowa, but all eyes (and most of the questions) were on Newt Gingrich, the current front runner, KUT's Ben Philpott reports

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Environment
4:59 pm
Wed October 26, 2011

The Top 25 Water Users in Austin

 

A few years back, Lance Armstrong was caught. He apologized, admitted the error of his ways, and promised to do better in the future. His offense? Using too much water.

Armstrong had used 330,000 gallons of water in July 2008. He hadn’t even been home at his three acre, 14,475 square foot estate. “I’m a little shocked,” he told a newspaper at the time. “There’s no justification for that much water. I need to fix this.”

Well, it’s been several summers since then, this last one being notable for being the hottest and driest on record. And the city is in stage two watering restrictions because of the historic drought.  But it would appear Armstrong has not learned how to conserve. According to data from Austin Water Utility, he used around 1.3 million gallons of water in the last year, putting him among the top ten residential users of water in town.

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Events
4:21 pm
Fri October 21, 2011

Will the Gypsy Picnic Redeem Itself This Year?

It's time again for the Gypsy Picnic Trailer Food Festival, which takes off this Saturday from 11 am to 8 pm at Auditorium Shores.

Last year's picnic was anything but. Long lines (up to an hour for a donut), nightmare parking, vendors running out of food, and massive crowds soured many attendants.

The festival received a two-star rating on Yelp!, and led John Kelso of the Austin American-Statesman to quip: "If you wanted something to eat, it would have been quicker to sit on the corner with a tin cup, collect change and grab a tuna sandwich at a convenience store. Or bag a possum and build a fire."

This year promises to be different, according to Festival Marketing Manager Lindsay Hoffman of C3 Presents, which is producing the festival.

"Last year was the first year of the festival, so everything was unknown. We couldn't even anticipate those kind of numbers," she told KUT News.

"This year we're working with those kind of [anticipated] numbers, so it's a lot easier to work with the food vendors and prepare them to get their menu out faster," Hoffman said. "We've taken in all the feedback from last year."

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Economy
2:02 pm
Fri October 21, 2011

The Top 5 Stats From Today's Texas Jobs Report

Bureau of Labor Statistics

The latest job numbers were released by the Texas Workforce Commission today, and while there's no startling news to report, there are some interesting tidbits:

  1. Texas's employment advantage may be fading. The state's unemployment rate is up to 8.5 percent from 8.2 percent a year ago, while the national unemployment rate has fallen from 9.6 percent a year ago to 9.1 percent this month.
  2. Austin had the lowest unemployment rate among the five largest cities in Texas, at 7.4 percent (same as last month, but up from 7 percent a year ago). The highest? El Paso, at 10.6 percent (up a full point from a year ago).
  3. Much of the state's job creation has come in the private sector, which added 26,500 jobs. But...
  4. The public sector is taking a beating. It lost over 11,000 jobs in September, and has shed 33,700 jobs since September last year.
  5. The highest percentage of job gains in the state came in the "Professional and Business Services" category, which includes professions like accountants, lawyers, computer engineers and the like. They're up 5.3 percent in job gains since last September.

The full release from the commission can be found here, with notes by KUT News.

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