Ryan Poppe

Ryan started his radio career in 2002 working for Austin’s News Radio KLBJ-AM as a show producer for the station's organic gardening shows. This slowly evolved into a role as the morning show producer and later as the group’s executive producer.

Eventually converting into an on-air reporter, Ryan has covered topics ranging from crime to the political process at the state capitol.

Ryan and his wife Mary own a home in Leander. He enjoys spending time at many of areas parks and outdoor spots with his son Luke and listening to live music at some of Austin jazz and reggae hotspots.  

Ryan is the cook in the family and it is understood that the kitchen is his territory. His favorite menu items range from Jamaican to North African fare to modern Thai-cuisine.

Ryan Poppe/Texas Public Radio

Today was the last day to file for candidacy in the statewide primary election. One of the candidates making a last-minute filing was former Land Commissioner Jerry Patterson.

The start of the 2018 election cycle is just around the corner and Democrats remain silent on who will be at the top of their ticket.  Political experts believe the party may now be frantic to find a candidate for the job.


Ken Piorkowski/Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Public radio stations from across the state collaborated on this series looking at the death penalty in Texas – its history, how it’s changed, whom it affects and its future. The following story is from Texas Public Radio:

When you hear about the death penalty in Texas, the discussion often focuses on criminal proceedings or policy. Often overlooked – how the death penalty affects victim’s families – the people left struggling to find healing in the wake of violent crimes.

When state lawmakers meet in January they will once again square off over using public school dollars to pay for attending private schools.   Opponents of that practice call it a voucher program.  Supporters tend to call it school choice.  And the debate during this next session will include special needs children.

PHOTOS BY THE TEXAS TRIBUNE AND GAGE SKIDMORE

It’s no secret Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are two of the most disliked major party nominees to ever run for President.

That has some Texans searching for other options – any options – when it comes to our next commander and chief. Austinite Kaia Tingley asked: “Can we vote for either Libertarian or Green Party candidates in Texas?”


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