Ron Elving

Ron Elving is the NPR News' Senior Washington Editor directing coverage of the nation's capital and national politics and providing on-air political analysis for many NPR programs.

Elving can regularly be heard on Talk of the Nation providing analysis of the latest in politics. He is also heard on the "It's All Politics" weekly podcast along with NPR's Ken Rudin.

Under Elving's leadership, NPR has been awarded the industry's top honors for political coverage including the Edward R. Murrow Award from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, a 2002 duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton for excellence in broadcast journalism, the Merriman Smith Award for White House reporting from the White House Correspondents Association and the Barone Award from the Radio and Television Correspondents Association. In 2008, the American Political Science Association awarded NPR the Carey McWilliams Award "in recognition of a major contribution to the understanding of political science."

Before joining NPR in 1999, Elving served as political editor for USA Today and for Congressional Quarterly. He came to Washington in 1984 as a Congressional Fellow with the American Political Science Association and worked for two years as a staff member in the House and Senate. Previously, Elving served as a reporter and state capital bureau chief for the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. He was a media fellow at Stanford University and the University of Wisconsin at Madison.

Over his career, Elving has written articles published by The Washington Post, the Brookings Institution, Columbia Journalism Review, Media Studies Journal, and the American Political Science Association. He was a contributor and editor for eight reference works published by Congressional Quarterly Books from 1990 to 2003. His book, Conflict and Compromise: How Congress Makes the Law, was published by Simon & Schuster in 1995. Recently, Elving contributed the chapter, "Fall of the Favorite: Obama and the Media," to James Thurber's Obama in Office: The First Two Years.

Elving teaches public policy in the school of Public Administration at George Mason University and has also taught at Georgetown University, American University and Marquette University.

With an bachelor's degree from Stanford, Elving went on to earn master's degrees from the University of Chicago and the University of California-Berkeley.

It's All Politics
10:05 am
Wed January 29, 2014

Obama Showed A Deft Hand With Speech. Why Not With Congress?

President Obama shakes hands after giving the State of the Union address before a joint session of Congress on Tuesday.
Larry Downing AP

Originally published on Wed January 29, 2014 1:40 pm

The toughest test of a card player comes not with a big hand or a sheer bust, but rather with cards somewhere in between. Then it's not the deal that makes the difference — it's the sheer skill of the player.

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Politics
7:55 am
Mon August 27, 2012

Tempest in Tampa: Isaac Tests Mitt Romney's Mettle

Mitt Romney, who this week is set to accept the Republican presidential nomination, with wife Ann on Sunday in Wolfeboro, N.H.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 27, 2012 8:12 am

Political conventions are famed for focusing the nation's attention on one name, but at this year's Republican National Convention here in Tampa, that name is not the nominee's.

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2012 Presidential Election
8:25 am
Thu February 23, 2012

Desert Face-Off May Have Closed Out Debate Season. So What Did We Learn?

Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney waves to the crowd as he is introduced at the start of Wednesday night's Republican presidential debate in Mesa, Ariz.
Ross D. Franklin AP

Originally published on Thu February 23, 2012 5:53 am

Ten months and a score of debates ago, the Republican Party and a slew of news organizations brought forth on our TV screens a new definition of a presidential nominating process — conceived in targeted marketing and dedicated to the proposition that no number of debates was too many for hardcore conservatives.

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2012 Presidential Election
9:11 am
Sun January 22, 2012

South Carolina GOP Bets Its Winning Streak On A Long Shot

Newt Gingrich along with his wife, Callista, addresses supporters at the Hilton Hotel in Columbia, S.C. following his primary victory. South Carolina voters have chosen the GOP nominee since 1980.
JEFF SINER MCT /Landov

Originally published on Sat January 21, 2012 11:49 pm

By embracing Newt Gingrich in its primary, the South Carolina GOP has risked its remarkable record of success at picking the party's eventual nominee for president.

It's been quite a run. Beginning with its primary in 1980, when it chose Ronald Reagan, South Carolina has voted first among Southern states. And the Palmetto State's choice has gone on to dominate the other Southern states and lock up the nomination in short order. That happened eight times in a row, counting incumbent renominations.

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2012 Presidential Election
10:39 am
Wed August 24, 2011

Republicans Yearn For More On The 2012 Presidential Trail

Rep. Paul Ryan (R-WI).
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 24, 2011 9:46 am

The conservative opinion journal The Weekly Standard reported this week that Paul Ryan has decided "for the final time" that he will not be a candidate for president in 2012.

The overtones of disappointment were not just audible, they were deafening. Even though Ryan has repeatedly rebuffed such urgings for months, the magazine had been picking up – and eagerly broadcasting – signals that the House Budget Chairman was reconsidering.

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politics
9:48 am
Mon August 15, 2011

Where Does The GOP Race Stand Now?

Originally published on Sun August 14, 2011 5:57 pm

The Republicans settled their Minnesota sweepstakes over the weekend, but the argument over Iowa goes on.

The small Midwestern state once again claimed the national spotlight for itself and dominated the news media. But whether the latest round of fundraising and polling there amounts to a real watershed for the Republican field is highly debatable.

It is likely the entry into the field of Texas Gov. Rick Perry this weekend, a deed carried out in the rival early-voting state of South Carolina, will look more important in hindsight.

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