Rhonda Fanning

Producer, The Texas Standard

Rhonda  joined KUT in late 2013 as producer for the station's new daily news program, Texas Standard. Rhonda will forever be known as the answer to the trivia question, “Who was the first full-time hire for The Texas Standard?”  She’s an Iowa native who got her start in public radio at WFSU in Tallahassee, while getting her Master's Degree in Library Science at Florida State University. Prior to joining KUT and The Texas Standard, Rhonda was a producer for Wisconsin Public Radio. 

Image via Pixabay (Public Domain)

From Texas Standard.

It’s been two days since a young gunman opened fire on a Florida high school, taking many lives and forever altering many more. As outsiders to this event, it’s probably about the time when we begin to move on. It’s harder, though, to resist the hurt for those who relate directly to the victims – parents of high schoolers in this case. And it’s harder for those who work in schools, which have so often been the target of horrific mass shootings.

Misty Hurley

From Texas Standard.

The other day, scrolling through Twitter, we came across a picture of two cannons from the Alamo laid out in the bed of a pickup truck, parked outside of a Buc-ee’s. We wondered why these cannons were on a road trip. Turns out it’s part of a restoration project being conducted by the Alamo and Texas A&M University’s Conservation Laboratory.

Pixabay Creative Commons

From Texas Standard.

For eight years, in southwest Houston, a brothel operated out of a shabby apartment complex. Locals who knew about it didn’t speak up, fearful of retribution from the gang-affiliated family that police say was running the operation.

Undocumented women and girls, some as young as 14, were beaten, drugged, and lured with promises of restaurant jobs that never materialized. The FBI taketown targeted the operations of the Southwest Cholos gang, though this operation only hints at how much of a problem human sex trafficking has become in Texas’ biggest city.

Spencer Selvidge/KUT News

From Texas Standard.

Bacon, blue jeans and beer: three commodities that many Texans take for granted are at stake as Mexico, Canada and the U.S. resume talks about the future of the North American Free Trade Agreement, or NAFTA, this week.

New York Times Reporter Ana Swanson writes that the outcome of these talks may have a more serious impact on Texans’ everyday lives than many realize.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT

From Texas Standard.

On Monday, the Washington Post broke the story of the now-defunct voter fraud commission purchasing Texas voter records. The story began:

“President Donald Trump’s voting commission asked every state and the District of Columbia for detailed voter registration data, but in Texas’ case it took an additional step: It asked to see Texas records that identify all voters with Hispanic surnames, newly released documents show.”

Officials from both the White House and the state of Texas say the data was never delivered, because of a lawsuit brought by Texas voting rights advocates after the request was made.