Rhonda Fanning

Producer, The Texas Standard

Rhonda  joined KUT in late 2013 as producer for the station's new daily news program, Texas Standard. Rhonda will forever be known as the answer to the trivia question, “Who was the first full-time hire for The Texas Standard?”  She’s an Iowa native who got her start in public radio at WFSU in Tallahassee, while getting her Master's Degree in Library Science at Florida State University. Prior to joining KUT and The Texas Standard, Rhonda was a producer for Wisconsin Public Radio. 

Gage Skidmore/Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Just two weeks after its introduction, and with a total of zero hearings, the U.S. House has approved what could be the biggest change to tax policy in at least a generation. The Senate Finance Committee also passed a GOP-sponsored tax bill that differs somewhat from the House measure.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT News

From Texas Standard.

The forces arrayed against Alabama judge Roy Moore are mounting. A fifth woman has come forward with sexual misconduct allegations against Alabama’s Republican candidate in the U.S. Senate race. Lawmakers in Texas may have to focus on problems closer to home, though, based on reports that are now coming to light.

Photo credit: Martyna Borkowski for Rubenstein/Flickr Creative Commons

From Texas Standard.

More allegations surfaced over the past week involving high-profile American men with a history of sexual harassment and molestation. From Alabama Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore to comedian Louis C.K., these revelations have rocked the country’s political landscape, the entertainment industry, and NPR.

Many of these accusations date back decades, but they’re coming out now. Joanna Grossman, the Endowed Chair in Women and the Law at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, says that doesn’t necessarily signal a new cultural shift.

Van Redin/National Geographic

From Texas Standard:

In the past, Hollywood was sometimes enlisted to tell an approved version of military events. Lately, though, stories on screens both large and small have begun to show more nuanced accounts of war from different and often more critical perspectives.

Now a new eight-part miniseries may help us understand a key moment in the war in Iraq: the 2004 attack on Sadr City.

Kellieallen/Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

From Texas Standard.

Our stereotypes of male athletes often go something like this; strong, dumb, macho. There’s even a phrase for the type of chauvinistic conversation that too often goes on behind the scenes on sports teams – locker room talk.

These stereotypes are not without some supporting evidence. Take, as just one example, the widespread and deplorable sexual assault scandal that continues to haunt the Baylor University football organization.

A program making its way through east Texas right now is aimed at redefining what it means to be a male athlete in an effort to stop that sort of behavior before it starts. An organization called Men Can Stop Rape is educating high school athletes on how to stop sexual assault on their teams and among their friends.

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