Rebecca McInroy

Host, Producer, Two Guys on Your Head, Views & Brews

Rebecca has worked at KUT since 2004, as a host, producer, car spot lady, general voice talent and show creator. Thinking it would only be a part time job to help her pay for grad school, she soon realized that public radio was in her blood, and a place where all of her interests from archeology to fashion could have a home.

She has created and continues to host and produce KUT shows like Views and Brews, Two Guys on Your Head and Liner Notes.

Rebecca's favorite things to do are hang out with her daughter, run and listen to highbrow BBC programs on her cracked iPhone 4.

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Two Guys on Your Head
9:02 am
Fri March 14, 2014

How Our Brains Process Time

Our brains perceive time differently in different circumstances. Listen to the Two Guys break it down.
flickr.com/martinaphotography

Time flies when you're having fun, the old saying goes. But how can time – maybe the most fundamental concept of the universe – feel different under different conditions?

Our brains perceive time differently in different circumstances. When we pay close attention to something, tedium can set in and it can feel like time slows to a crawl.

Conversely, if our lives demand we juggle several different things at once, we tend to pay less attention to some activities – and time races by in a flash.

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Two Guys on Your Head
8:50 am
Fri March 7, 2014

How Going Out is Good for Your Brain

While a deafening concert may not do your brain a lot of good, social interaction with other humans does.
Christian Holmér, christianholmer.com

Human beings are a social species. Our natural programming requires a certain amount of social contact with other people. 

Shared experiences are simply a fundamental component of our needs as humans. We don’t just have a need for direct interaction and verbal communication either – there's all sorts of nonverbal communicative actions we take in the presence of others that we wouldn’t do alone.

In this installment of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke take us through the psychological benefits of "going out" and mingling with our fellow humans.

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Two Guys on Your Head
9:09 am
Fri February 28, 2014

How to Crush Writer's Block

Credit justtegan.com

Writer’s block! That phrase might induce panic and a recollection of a familiar experience. It’s a very common phenomenon. So what is it?

When in the beginning stages of undertaking a new writing project, a writer might find themselves blocked – stuck in front of a blank page or screen with no thoughts coming to mind. This lack of creative flow is further exacerbated by anxiety over the lack of production – making it a self-perpetuating cycle that can lead to stagnation. 

In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke explain the ins and outs of how and why we sometimes get stuck – and what we can do to help ourselves in those difficult situations.  

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Two Guys on Your Head
10:24 am
Fri February 21, 2014

Why All Praise is Not Created Equal

Credit mvyso.blogspot.com

“Hey, you’re smart!”  That feels good to hear, doesn’t it?  Praise always feels good, but not all praise motivates us to try new things, challenge ourselves, or deal with failure.

In this episode of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke discuss how to praise in a productive and meaningful way.

In summary, when giving or receiving praise, it’s a helpful skill to think about where that praise is directed.  

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Two Guys on Your Head
10:28 am
Fri February 14, 2014

Life After Loss: How to Reshape, Move On and Let it Go

Credit holykaw.alltop.com

A traumatic event in life is like a scratch on a record. Every time the record player, or your mind, runs over the scratch, it skips. 

This skipping record thought pattern is called rumination. Until we’re able to fill the scratch, it will keep skipping. So how do we fill the scratch, move on and heal?

On this episode of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about the various ways we live with and explain grief, and they offer some strategies that might help it make sense.

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Views and Brews
11:37 am
Wed February 12, 2014

Steven Weinberg: A Life in Science

Credit photo by Matt Valentine

Tuesday’s Views and Brews discussion on "The Elegance of Physics with Dr. Steven Weinberg" was a standing room only event. Some patient fans of the Nobel Prize winning physicist were turned away because the event was at capacity despite of the chilly and wet night.

Professor Steven Weinberg is a Nobel laureate in physics, a theoretical physicist and  an outspoken thinker on topics ranging from nuclear weapons to atheism. But this night was about Weinberg’s life, career and development – not just as a thinker, but as an artist in his field.

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Two Guys on Your Head
2:21 pm
Fri February 7, 2014

Why Personality Tests Don't Tell What You Need To Know

Introverted or extroverted? Fans of personality tests might want to ask, what's in a name?
Credit healthmeup.com

When it comes to the Myers-Briggs personality type test, are you an introvert or an extrovert? Do you focus on sensing, or do you use your intuition to interpret information that you absorb? 

Does it matter?  Why is it so entertaining and satisfying for some people to answer these questions about themselves and others in their lives? 

Listen to the show and let the Two Guys, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke, demystify the wiry world of  personality tests for you.

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Two Guys on your head
8:40 am
Fri January 31, 2014

What's Going On Inside the Adolescent Brain?

There’s endless questions we could ask about how the brain works. A particularly interesting one: what's unique about the brain during adolescence?

During adolescence our brains are wired differently than adult brains will be – and for good reason. In adolescence our brains are in a process of development – so we’re less inhibited, allowing us to take the risks we need to learn about the world. In addition, the difference in brain physiology has other ramifications on behavior and needs. Ignoring them can make life more difficult for kids and parents.

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Two Guys on Your Head
10:59 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Debunking Myths Behind Different Learning Styles

Credit sharpschool.com

Are you an auditory learner or a visual learner?  If you answered "yes" you would be right. That's because we use all our senses to learn and process information.

In this edition of Two Guys On Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke dispel the myths behind learning styles preferences: they don’t really exist. 

Our reliance on the theories of learning styles to explain our success or failure of understanding certain information is actually serving our human need to put things into categories – combined with our need to explain things when they don’t work. 

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Two Guys on Your Head
12:06 pm
Fri December 20, 2013

Why Attractive People Get More Opportunities

Credit blog.ifabbo.com

When it comes to what humans find attractive, many factors play a role.

Evolutionarily speaking, we tend to be attracted to symmetry and markers that indicate health and wellness. In social terms it has more to do with what’s in fashion at a given moment. But it's when we begin to react to attractiveness that things get tricky.

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Two Guys on Your Head
10:35 am
Fri December 13, 2013

Why Creative Minds Think Alike

Credit hongkiat.com

The part of our brains that is responsible for generating creativity evolved throughout human existence to serve a problem-solving function. 

If you lived in the great, wild, open world as a primitive human, and your problems were things like predators, or food security sources, or a need for shelter, what would your brain do? 

Your brain would concoct creative strategies to solve those problems, and that’s what our minds have built a capacity to do as we’ve evolved – create solutions. Drs. Art Markman and Bob Duke give you more of the details.

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Two Guys on Your Head
8:45 am
Fri December 6, 2013

Protecting Your Brain as You Age

You're only as old as you feel: Continued activity - both physical and mental - protects you as you age.
flickr.com/jvandoor

Whether we like it or not, time marches on. And as it does, we age. 

One of the most challenging realities for everyone to face in life is that we are all, inevitably, destined to grow old (if we’re lucky, that is).

Aging correlates to a steady decline of functional abilities, both physical and mental. Memory and cognition peak in our early twenties, and we begin a very slow, steady decline of those functions as we near our senior years.  

After age 80, many bodily functions – including brain function – seem to have reached the average limit of their operation. So what can we do to preserve our brains for as long as possible?

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Two Guys on Your Head
9:37 am
Fri November 29, 2013

We Can Choose Our Delusions

Credit wikimedia.org

Merriam-Webster defines delusion as “a belief that is not true; a false idea.” But who’s to decide what is true? 

Being tagged as delusional carries a negative, unpleasant connotation – calling to mind straight jackets, or maybe some scenes from “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.” But thanks to our powers of perception – and Drs. Bob Duke and Art Markman – you can choose to change your definition of delusion. 

When you get down to it, much of human existence is delusional. We use our imaginations to fill in meaning, value, expectations and definitions around a small sliver of what we can actually observe in our surroundings. Our mental state – essentially our level of happiness or unhappiness – is based on how we choose to define and perceive our circumstances. 

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Two Guys on Your Head
12:04 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

The Psychological Dynamics of Thanksgiving Dinner

flickr.com/pinksherbet

For many of us, Thanksgiving means spending time with our families, carrying out traditions that we’ve practiced for years.

While it can be very stressful, messy, and challenging to spend time with family members you don’t see very often, it can also be a beautiful time of recentering. 

Traditions serve a psychological function. By repeating the same traditional activity with the same group of people over the years, we construct a chronological record of who we’ve been before – and who we are now. It’s a hidden way of staying in touch with the consistent elements of our identities, and it allows us to track ourselves as we develop and change. 

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Two Guys on Your Head
11:00 am
Fri November 15, 2013

How Words Are More Than Words

flickr.com/feuilllu

‘Sticks and stones may break my bones but words will never hurt me.’

Popular as they are, those words really aren’t as accurate as we would like them to be.

Words are a part of almost every aspect of our lives, and the words we use impact not only those we are speaking to, but the very way we see the world – and even the chemicals released in our brain.

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Views and Brews
1:04 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

All About The Groove

Nov. 18 marked the 14th anniversary of Doug Sahm's passing. And KUT marked the day with a special look back on the life and legacy of Doug Sahm at a Views and Brews.

Listen back as KUTX’s Jody Denberg hosts, author and historian Joe Nick Patoski and musical guests Marcia Ball, Speedy Sparks and Ernie Durawa  for a night of stories and music from the life of Doug Sahm.

Two Guys on Your Head
12:38 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

The Psychology of Rivalries

flickr.com/lifementalhealthpics

Even though competing sports teams who consider themselves rivals like to highlight their supposedly apparent differences – in actuality, rivals are more alike than they are different. They share a common goal, for which they are competing.

Rivalries allow us as humans to have a friendly competition. They can be energizing, and allow us to bond with our communities over success or failure. 

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Two Guys on Your Head
3:00 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

What is Texting and Email Doing to Face-to-Face Communication?

How does immediate mobile contact affect our relationships in real life?
flickr.com/cristiano_betta

If you live in the modern world – as you most likely do – you’re probably seen it: two people standing next to each other, engrossed in text conversations happening on their mobile devices, while oblivious to each other or anything else happening around them. 

Does that common occurrence make you reminisce about the good old days of landlines? You’re not alone. Many people pine for simplicity in this new world of immediate contact – all possible through our nifty mobile gadgets. 

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Two Guys on Your Head
2:53 pm
Mon October 28, 2013

When Our Brains Go on Autopilot

Mindless eating in front of the TV is one example of automaticity.
Flickr user apdk, bit.ly/Rvw4I8

We may think we’re making conscious decisions about everything we do on a daily basis – but a large portion of things we do during each day, we do without thinking about them.

Take turning on a light, or consuming snacks in front of the TV. These automatic behaviors are great because they allow our brains to consider more complex ideas and thoughts. They’re great, that is, until we are doing things automatically that are harmful to others or ourselves.

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Two Guys on Your Head
3:39 pm
Fri October 18, 2013

How to Learn From Failure

Success and failure: What's the difference? What's the value?
Credit stockmonkey.com

Failure is a scary word that carries a very negative connotation: “I’m a failure.” “He’s a failure.” “I don’t want to be a failure.” 

The word failure arouses emotional responses that we’d usually rather avoid.  What about the word success  The thought of success arouses images of comfort, ease and satisfaction.  Why?  It’s because of something in our brains. 

We’re wired with a dopamine reward system that releases positive or negative chemical affect in our brains depending upon the success or failure of our efforts.  Success feels good, while failure feels bad.  So we tend to seek success and avoid failure. It’s simple.  

But hang on a minute and let the Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke, tell you about a function of failure that is too often overlooked and discredited: Failure is a learning tool. 

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