Rebecca McInroy

Senior Producer & Host, Two Guys on Your Head, Views & Brews

Rebecca McInroy is a host, show creator, and senior producer, who produces a wide range of content for KUT, KUTX and KUT.ORG. Rebecca believes it is important that Public Radio directly connects with the community it serves. Many of her programs combine the talent, and knowledge of the Austin community, with the production arm of KUT/X Radio to produce content that bridges the gaps that lie between the world of news and entertainment.

Rebecca is the co-creator, host, and executive producer for Views and Brews, a discussion program taped live at the Cactus Cafe on the UT Campus.  With this show KUT invites the community in to explore a wide range of subjects and ideas. We’ve talked about Jazz and the Spiritual Journey through the music of John Coltrane, The History of Defiance, Time, Memory, Food Politics, and much more. Our goal is to engage with the community to share thoughts, inspire new perspectives, and develop compelling content all while involving Austin in the discussion.

She is the co-creator, and executive producer for: Two Guys on Your Head, with Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke; Liner Notes, with Rabbi and jazz historian Neil Blumofe; and The Write Up with Owen Egerton.

She is also the co-creator, host, and executive producer for In Perspective, a round-table discussion program, produced in collaboration with The Humanities Media Project, that works to illuminate the importance of humanities research in a broader context.

Rebecca is currently in pre-production on The Secret Ingredient with Tom Philpott and Raj Patel, that will focus on the history of food systems, and food politics. This show is set to launch in September of 2015

Ways to Connect

Painkillers: What Are They Really Killing?

Jul 10, 2015
Eric Norris/flickr

Painkillers: Our societal views on pain are right there in the name of its cure — or, rather, primary form of treatment.

The high reliance on painkillers by the medical community has become an increasingly controversial topic. And for patients, that reliance can easily transform a treatment to an addiction or recreational drug use.

flickr/creative commons

Pain can range from barely noticeable to excruciating. Yet pain, in all its forms, is important. It is how the body communicates there is a problem.

Physical pain in the ankle may ask us to stop walking so fast or demand a pair of crutches immediately. Likewise, emotional pain may indicate that we need to talk about a problem with our partner or severe the relationship entirely.

In this episode of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke, add to the series on pain and the brain, with a discussion on emotional pain and memory.

Understanding how our brains interpret pain is an ongoing investigation. Some think pain can be as much a physical phenomenon as it is a cultural one. While in the West pain management seems to be just part of life. We wanted to investigate what psychology can tell us about pain and the brain.

In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke, kick off our three-part series on "Pain and The Brain" with a discussion of "Phantom Pain." What it is, and how psychologists are finding new ways of helping patients who suffer with it.

Even though is seems like a neverending April day in Austin, it's technically summertime. For some of us that means we take a break, with the intention of tackling all those projects we never had time to get to during the harsh Austin winter.

So why, when the summer comes to an end, do we feel disappointed when we haven't written that novel or cleaned out the closets?

In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about the many elements of summer that can make it difficult to let go, and how re-thinking our intentions and being present can allow us to make the most of time off.

Kari Anne Roy

It’s a true pleasure to get to sit down with Holt on The Write Up and discuss her craft and career and how she balances daily life, deadlines and being a mother of three. Join us as we chat about the attraction of writing for a younger audience, her love for underdogs and preteen ne’er-do-wells, and the allure of poetry.

Her novel Mike Stellar: Nerves of Steel won praise from readers all over the nation. Her poetry shines in her collection Haiku Mama: Because 17 Syllables is All You Have Time to Read, written under the name Kari Anne Roy, is a collection of haikus hilariously bemoaning the struggles and joys of parenting.

Nuclear energy. Penicillin. Lasers.

Science produces some pretty groundbreaking discoveries, but when we focus on the products, as opposed to the process, we miss a huge part of what makes science one of the most valuable resources we have as humans.

In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about some of the aspects of science education that could be improved upon, in order to ensure we have a public that's well-informed.

When you think of science, what comes to mind? Maybe you think about launching rockets into space, or antibiotics, or the electric car?

Maybe not. But let's say you do. If that is the case, it's more accurate to say you love what scientific developments have brought us, but not necessarily science itself.

In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about what science is, why the scientific process is important to understand and why it's so difficult to communicate science to the general public.

Why Seeing Isn't Believing

May 22, 2015

Philosophers have long proposed that there is no objective reality. And now science agrees — at least as far as our personal experiences are concerned.

Perception is the process of interpreting our present environment through the lens of our past experiences. Everything we sense, think, feel, and even remember, actually arises in response to a combination of what is currently happening and our stored long-term memories. 

In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Bob Duke and Dr. Art Markman discuss the evolutionary advantages of flexible perception, and how this process can influence both our behavior and modern day society.

Have you ever been to a Whole Foods or maybe a co-op and seen labels that say things like, "gluten-free", "non-gmo," "no antibiotics," "free-roaming," "BPA-free," and wondered to yourself, "What does this all mean?" Well, you're not alone. It's a complex, cloudy world when it comes to food these days, and sometimes it's hard to know what's good, what's bad and what you can afford (both ethically and financially) .

In this episode of In Perspective, we'll try to gain a better understanding of food and the food industry, and also explore why things are so complicated when it comes to what we eat.

Do ever get that burning feeling in your stomach that a situation just isn't fair and you must react? That feeling is an important part of our motivational system, and something we as humans evolved to protect.

In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke discuss how defiance may be best viewed, and responded to, as a reassertion of autonomy in situations where people feel a loss of control and self-identity.

Have you ever worked with a group of people on a project and really felt like you carried the lion's share of the weight? And then you think back on it and realize you always do more, you always have the great idea, and you never get the recognition you rightfully deserve?

It might be that you are both the problem and the solution.

In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about the psychology of egocentric bias. It can be pretty destructive, but not necessarily in ways we predict.

Are you an auditory learner or a visual learner?  If you answered, "yes," you'd be right. That's because we use all our senses to learn and process information.

In this edition of Two Guys On Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke dispel the myths behind learning styles preferences: In fact, they don’t really exist. 

Our reliance on the theories of learning styles to explain our success or failure of understanding certain information is actually more about serving our human need to put things into categories – combined with our need to explain things when they don’t work.

Questions that lead to no answers. Wounds that never quite heal. The unhinged time of tragedy and grief. The soft, relentless whispering of the abused, the murdered, the lost. This is the world of Scott Blackwood.

Scott Blackwood is one of the most lyrical of modern American writers. His prose rings with poetry. His work explores community, grief, and the secrets that run through our lives.

In this edition of The Write Up, Blackwood talks about his new novel See How Small and explains why he is drawn to this story and the harrowing task of researching it. With a careful balance of compassion and curiosity, Blackwood reached out to many of the people connected to the actual murders including family members and first responders. Blackwood’s goal in this novel, and in all his work, is to recover lost voices.

audiobooks rock/flickr

Have you ever told someone, "Hey, I read that book!" then continued with a guilty, "...well, I listened to the audio version." 

It's time to wash that guilt right out of your soul, because in this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke, talk about how our brains process information differently based on how we consume it.

Negotiations are everywhere, in almost every element of our daily lives, but how do we understand negotiations? It turns out that the way we frame the idea of negotiation has a lot to do with how we understand value and happiness.

In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke discuss the various elements of negotiation.

What is the value of our relationships? As it turns out, the way we answer that question defines the relationship itself.

In this episode of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about the various ways we understand the economics of the relationships in our lives, and why the value of community should never be underestimated.

This episode recognizes the complexity of women, gender, and sexuality with a discussion from contemporary and historical perspectives. Our discussants share what they’ve learned from their respective research projects while exploring how privilege and power function when it comes to constructions of gender and sexuality.

Ultimately, they agree that listening with empathy to each other’s needs and desires demonstrates mutual respect and can allow us to have greater faith in our individuality.

**The following contains a frank discussion about gender and sexuality.**


When it comes to bias, we as a species have a long way to go. Even when we know the importance of diversity and we’re aware of our own biases, we still need help overcoming our preferential treatment toward certain groups and people.

In this episode of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about a study that points to how our biases effect our decisions, even when we have the best of intentions.

There's no such thing as a "tell." For example, when people look up, fidget or stutter they might just be nervous, and not exactly lying. However, because we rely on the truth to make our culture go round, it might make our lives easier if we could just spot a liar out of the crowd.

As it turns out you can tell if people are telling the truth or not, but it takes some skill, time and knowledge.

In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about lying, and a new study that reveals a more accurate way to catch someone in a lie.

Amanda Eyre Ward is not afraid.

In researching her first novel Sleep Toward Heaven, Amanda sat down with convicted murderers waiting on death row to explore their regrets and hopes. While writing her novel Forgive Me, Amanda traveled to South Africa to experience the ethnic tensions of Johannesburg first-hand

In this episode of The Write Up, we discuss her latest novel The Same Sky her penchant for telling stories of the voiceless and powerless, the importance of looking past political divides to tell the stories of real people and how exploring the lives of others has impacted her own own.