Nathan Bernier

Host, All Things Considered

Nathan Bernier a KUT reporter and the local host during All Things Considered and Marketplace. He grew up in the small mountain town of Nelson, BC, Canada, and worked at commercial news radio stations in Ottawa, Montreal and Boston before starting at KUT in 2008. 

Nathan has won numerous journalism awards including a National Edward R. Murrow Award, Texas Associated Press Awards, Lonestar Awards from the Houston Press Club, and various other awards and recognitions.  

Ways to Connect

Ricardo B. Brazziell, Austin American-Statesman

Among the new restaurants popping up on Burnet Road in North Austin is a French-inspired place the owners describe as a cross between Waffle House and a French bistro.

We asked Austin American-Statesman restaurant critic Matthew Odam about his review of Bonhomie


Ralph Barrera, Austin American-Statesman

A restaurant that opened in 1946 in Austin's Bouldin Creek neighborhood just got a major overhaul. Green Pastures is now Mattie's at Green Pastures.

Does the new food live up to the character and history of the establishment? We asked Austin American-Statesman restaurant critic Matthew Odam about his review.


Matthew Odam, Austin American-Statesman

A food truck on East Cesar Chavez is serving up street food from northern Thailand. We get a review of Dee Dee Thai from Austin American-Statesman restaurant critic Matthew Odam.


Ralph Barrera, Austin American-Statesman

The bánh mì is a Vietnamese baguette sandwich that blends ingredients from France and Vietnam. With Austin's large number of Vietnamese restaurants, there is no shortage of places to try. Austin American-Statesman restaurant critic spoke to us about his new list of his ten favorite places in the city to order a bánh mì. 

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

When James and Annetta White opened the Broken Spoke in 1964, South Lamar Boulevard had barbed wire fences and rolling pasture — a far cry from the condominiums, restaurants and traffic you see today. But a walk inside the honky-tonk dance hall today doesn’t feel much different than it would have 50 years ago.

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