Nathan Bernier

Host, All Things Considered

Nathan Bernier a KUT reporter and the local host during All Things Considered and Marketplace. He grew up in the small mountain town of Nelson, BC, Canada, and worked at commercial news radio stations in Ottawa, Montreal and Boston before starting at KUT in 2008. 

Nathan has won numerous journalism awards including a National Edward R. Murrow Award, Texas Associated Press Awards, Lonestar Awards from the Houston Press Club, and various other awards and recognitions.  

Ways to Connect

Frank Wolfe

Fifty years ago today — Oct. 2, 1967 — Thurgood Marshall was sworn in as the first African-American justice on the U.S. Supreme Court. A former White House aide says President Lyndon B. Johnson knew he was going to nominate Marshall from the moment he became president in 1963.

“Both of them knew it would be a really vicious battle in the confirmation process,” said Joseph A. Califano Jr., Johnson’s Chief Assistant for Domestic Affairs from 1965 to 1969.

Stephen Spillman for the Austin American-Statesman

Food made with ingredients sourced from the Texas Hill Country is the focus of a new restaurant in East Austin. We spoke with Austin American-Statesman restaurant critic Matthew Odam about his review of Pitchfork Pretty.


Empanadas and other baked goods from Paraguay are featured at a new cafe and bakery on Montopolis Drive near Riverside Drive. Austin American-Statesman restaurant critic Matthew Odam tells us about his review of Cafe Nena'i.


Miguel Gutierrez Jr., KUT News.

A program the Austin City Council approved in March to fast-track permitting for builders who pay construction workers at least $13.50/hr, offer training in safety and worker's compensation along with other requirements could be eliminated as part of an effort in the Texas legislature to speed up construction permitting.

We spoke to Texas Tribune reporter Andy Duehren about his story on this.


Ralph Barrera, Austin American-Statesman

A new fried chicken joint in the Mueller Development is bringing back a classic Austin brand with a heavy dose of nostalgia. We asked Austin American-Statesman restaurant critic Matthew Odam about his review of J.T. Youngblood's.

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