Molly Evans

Molly Evans is the Assistant Producer of Digital News at KERA. She writes, edits and curates news content on KERANews.org. She also maintains the Twitter feed for KERA News. Molly previously served as Digital Coordinator, maintaining KERA’s websites and various digital platforms as well as designing graphics, participating in digital projects and site builds and offering technical assistance to the staff. She has worked at KERA since January 2015.
 
Before KERA, Molly interned with This Land Press in Tulsa, TulsaPeople magazine World Literature Today in Norman and the Oklahoma Gazette in Oklahoma City, where she also freelanced. She also wrote and edited for The Oklahoma Daily, the award-winning student newspaper at the University of Oklahoma in Norman.
 
Molly graduated from OU with a bachelor’s degree in journalism and a minor in Spanish in December 2014. She was awarded Outstanding Senior in Journalism from the Gaylord College of Journalism and Mass Communication. Molly is a native of Tulsa, Okla. 

Dallas City Hall Plaza had plenty of foot traffic Saturday, first from students and gun reform advocates in the morning — and later from counter-protesters in the early afternoon.

Both demonstrations were planned in light of the National Rifle Association's annual meeting, held across the street at the Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center.

Last updated, 3:55 p.m. 

President Donald Trump assured attendees of the National Rifle Association’s Leadership Forum Friday that his administration is fighting to protect their constitutional right to bear arms.

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. for KUT

Tens of thousands of people, including the president, vice president and top Texas elected officials, are gathering in Dallas later this week for the National Rifle Association’s 147th annual meeting. And protesters will be active throughout.

One Dallas police officer has died from his injuries and a second remains in critical condition after they were shot while trying to remove a man from a Home Depot in Northeast Dallas Tuesday afternoon.

The North Texas-based maker of bump stocks, which allow semi-automatic weapons to fire like a machine gun, has announced it will shut down its website and stop taking orders for the devices next month.

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