Michael Marks

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT News

From Texas Standard.

If you’ve ever been to a Walmart in Texas looking for liquor, you’ve noticed that, by law, they don’t sell it. Beer and wine, yes, but not spirits like tequila or whiskey.

And that’s because of a somewhat arcane law that allows privately owned corporations to sell liquor, but prevents public traded companies from doing the same. But now, that could change. Walmart sued to challenge that rule, and on Wednesday a federal district judge sided with the retail giant.


From Texas Standard.

We’ve all got bills – and the state of Texas does, too. Bills are nothing to be afraid of, if you can manage them. If you miss some payments or take on more debt than is healthy, your credit score will go down and your interest rates will go up. Suddenly, your debt has become overwhelming.

Currently, Texas has a AAA credit rating, the best there is, so it’s less expensive for the state to borrow money and it makes for a hospitable business environment. Texas Comptroller Glenn Hegar has issued a warning about the state’s credit rating and its rainy day fund, which helps the state keep up with its long term liabilities.

Diann Bayes/Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard.

A gas explosion in Dallas last month killed a 12-year old girl and brought new attention to an aging infrastructure. The natural gas supplier, Atmos Energy, says it’s upgrading old steel pipes in the area, but many wonder why it took a deadly explosion to draw attention to the issue in the first place.

andrewbateman/Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

The 2018 NCAA Women’s Basketball Tournament tips off Friday. And the road to the championship may go through Texas. Although there are only three Lone Star State schools in the field of 64, you could make a strong case for each one’s title chances.


From Texas Standard.

President Donald Trump has declared the opioid epidemic a public health emergency. The Texas Department of State Health Services says more than 1,100 Texans died from opioids in 2016. Cities and counties across the state have had to increase services to meet the demand.