Matt Largey

Managing Editor

Matt has been an editor and reporter at KUT off and on since 2006.  He came to Austin from Boston, then went back for a while--but couldn't stand to be away--so he came back to Austin.  Matt grew up in Maine (but hates lobster), and while it might sound hard to believe, he thinks Maine and Texas are remarkably similar.

Ways to Connect

Flickr user Michael Coté

We know distrust in journalism is high right now. So we want to get your thoughts on which news sources you trust – and which ones you don't.

Wikimedia Commons

The Associated Press is reporting the existence of a draft memo from U.S. Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly that proposes the deployment of as many as 100,000 National Guard troops to enforce immigration laws in 11 states, including Texas. The memo is dated Jan. 25.

The AP writes:

Austin Police Department

Austin City Council has approved a $3.25 million settlement with the family of a black 17-year-old who was unarmed and naked when he was shot and killed by an Austin police officer last year.

“It is our sincere hope that the public nature of the settlement will make future police shootings less likely,” David Johnson's mother, Ketty Sully, said in a statement. “David was a wonderful son and a loving brother. He will remain in our hearts forever.”

The statement continued: 

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Travis County Sheriff Sally Hernandez plans to evaluate a wider range of alleged crimes in determining whether to hand over jail inmates to federal immigration authorities. 

Hernandez changed the policy at the Travis County Jail earlier this month, saying deputies would honor Immigration and Customs Enforcement requests to detain people for possible immigration violations only if an inmate was booked on capital murder, murder, aggravated sexual assault or human trafficking charges.

That Other Paper/Flickr

The 2017 Texas Legislative session is underway. State legislators meet every other year for 140 days in a frenzy of debating (sometimes arguing), deal-making, stand-taking, bill-killing and, occasionally, law-making.

For the past few weeks, we've been asking what you want to know about the Legislature: how it works, why it works the way it does and what you want lawmakers to do.

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