Matt Largey

Managing Editor

Matt has been an editor and reporter at KUT off and on since 2006.  He came to Austin from Boston, then went back for a while--but couldn't stand to be away--so he came back to Austin.  Matt grew up in Maine (but hates lobster), and while it might sound hard to believe, he thinks Maine and Texas are remarkably similar.

Ways to Connect

Martin do Nascimento/KUT

About 85,000 people visit Hippie Hollow every year.

The park on the shore of Lake Travis, just outside Austin, is well-known as a place where you can go to get some sun – without the tan lines. It's thought to be Texas' only clothing-optional public park.

But how did it get that way?

KUT

It's time for another voting round for our ATXplained project.

We've gathered questions from audience members that they want us to investigate. Now, you get to choose which question we pursue. 

This time, we have three questions about streets in Austin.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

When you're driving down Lamar Boulevard between Lady Bird Lake and Fifth Street, do you ever look at the walls of the underpass beneath the train bridge? Do you look at those blank blue signs on the walls of the underpass and wonder: What the heck are those things?

Laura Bauman does. So she asked about them for our ATXplained project.

We're ready for the next voting round in our ATXplained project, where we collect questions from our audience, put them to a vote and then investigate the winning question.

This time, as we enter the hottest months of the year, we're putting three lake-related questions head-to-head. 

Here are the candidates:

  • What happened to Austin's "Aqua Fest"? Why did it stop?
  • What effort went into taming the Colorado River into the Highland Lakes?
  • Why is Hippie Hollow on Lake Travis clothing optional?

Use the form below to cast your vote!

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Capital Metro is moving ahead with plans to build a signature station at the MetroRail stop near the Austin Convention Center. The $22 million project will include upgrades to shade passengers waiting at the Fourth Street commuter train stop. 

That got us wondering about the 2,649 CapMetro bus stops that may not be getting this kind of attention. Anyone who has ever waited for the bus in the summer knows it can be a torturous experience. 

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