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Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Morning Edition host Jennifer Stayton met with students in the journalism program at Reagan Early College High School in Austin this week. Hear what they had to say about the state of journalism today:


Matthew Bernhardt/Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

From Texas Standard.

There have been plenty of causes for debate along the I-35 corridor between Austin and San Antonio, but this time around, the conversation revolves around soccer. After the owner of a major league soccer team in Ohio announced plans to move the team to Austin, San Antonio officials who have had their sights set on bringing an MLS team to their city were less than elated.

The owner of the Columbus Crew said recently he was considering moving the franchise to Texas’ capitol city. The news has prompted Bexar County Judge Nelson Wolff to call for a formal investigation, claiming that the decision to choose Austin over San Antonio was not a “fair process” since the MLS had previously encouraged city and county officials to make preparations for an MLS team.

Texas Public Radio Reporter Joey Palacios says this particular feud dates as far back as 2013 when the MLS announced it was going to add four teams to the league. He says the City of San Antonio and Bexar County paid $9 million to build a soccer field on the northeast side of town on the advice of MLS officials in order to better their chances of winning the bid to bring one of the new teams to the city.

From Texas Standard:

You’ve seen them as you drive along lonely Texas highways or tucked away in the odd corner of an otherwise urban landscape. They're the bones of once-loved homes, cemeteries overgrown with weeds, even whole towns that time forgot: They're ghost towns.

Pudelek (Marcin Szala/Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0)

From Texas Standard.

Tuesday, the National Transportation Safety Board singled out the Federal Aviation Administration as a factor in last year’s deadly hot air balloon crash in Lockhart. The crash killed 15 passengers and the pilot.

The direct cause of the crash has been determined to be pilot error, but the NTSB said the FAA’s lack of oversight of commercial balloon pilots contributed to this tragedy.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT News

From Texas Standard.

During Hurricane Harvey, the Army Corps of Engineers decided to open the floodgates to release water from the Addicks and Barker Reservoirs. Thousands of downstream properties flooded. Now, many of those affected are suing to recoup damages from that flood.

They’re arguing that the government essentially took their property without permission when they released water from the dams.

L.M. Sixel, a business reporter with the Houston Chronicle, says it’s turning into quite the frenzy for lawyers of all stripes.

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