Emily Donahue

News Director

Emily Donahue is KUT’s news director. She has spent more than two decades in broadcast journalism and launched KUT’s news department in 2001.  Previously, Emily was part of the Peabody-award winning team at Marketplace as producer of the Marketplace Morning Report. Since coming to KUT, Emily has overseen a doubling of the news staff and content, the accumulation of more than 50 local, national and international awards for journalistic excellence and served on several boards, including the Texas Associated Press Broadcasters and as a member of the 2011 Texas Association of Broadcasters Open Government Task Force. Emily lives in Austin and is currently working on her Master’s in Journalism from the University of Texas at Austin.

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Business
3:26 pm
Mon December 16, 2013

Do Women CEOs Have a Tougher Time Pitching Start-Ups?

Dr. Hill working with a lab assistant at Spot On Sciences.
Credit Spot On Sciences

In baseball, the crowd holds its breath, waiting for the pitch.

In the business world, pitching is similar: suspense can be a killer, and ideas often get knocked down. Scrappy start-ups and venture capital abound in the modern economy, but success isn’t always guaranteed.

Dr. Jeanette Hill, CEO of Spot On Sciences and home blood test HemaSpot knows pitching – and it's nothing like what you’ve seen on "Shark Tank."

“You’ve got about 60 seconds, sometimes up to two minutes,” she tells KUT’s David Brown. “You have to get your idea across, you have to sell the audience … get it out there without stumbling.”

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Texas
6:55 am
Wed December 11, 2013

Why Texas Can't Withold 911 Tapes

A makeshift memorial to the victims of the Sandy Hook mass shooting.
Voice of America via Wikimedia Commons

On Dec. 14, it will have been exactly one year since the school massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, Connecticut that killed a total of 28 people, including 20 children.

Over the past several days, national news media organizations have been struggling with the question of whether to publish the recently released 911 calls. Clearly, many victims' families simply want to be left alone – to not be forced to relive the horror. And yet a Connecticut judge ruled to release those tapes, citing state law. 

Other states specifically prohibit the release of 911 tapes. What about Texas? 

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Life & Arts
7:55 am
Fri December 6, 2013

Amy Tan's New Book 'The Valley of Amazement' is Filled With Family Secrets

The Valley of Amazement
Filipa Rodrigues for KUT News

It’s been eight years since Amy Tan’s last book. But critics are already saying “The Valley of Amazement” was worth waiting for. 

It’s a complicated story of mothers and daughters, secrets and lies, the past and the present, China and America. And – perhaps above all – it’s about women’s fierce wills to survive.

KUT's Emily Donahue spoke with Amy Tan about her new book. She was five years into writing a different novel, Tan says, when she took a new look at an old family photo.

“I had a photo of my grandmother sitting on my desk and it was my favorite photo of her,” Tan says. “She looks quite beautiful and dreamy eyed, and it is in fact the photo that is on the hard cover edition of ‘The Bonesetter's Daughter.’” 

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One Day in Dallas
6:00 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Inside Parkland Hospital & Aboard Air Force One the Day JFK Was Killed

The front page of The Dallas Times Herald after President Kennedy's assassination, on display by the Texas State Archives and Library Commission.
Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon, KUT News

Before that afternoon fifty years ago, neither Sid Davis nor Julian Read could have expected what they’d be called upon to do – much less that they’d both be eyewitnesses to history. 

Davis was a young radio reporter based in Washington D.C.

Read was on the other side of the journalistic fence, serving as press aide for Texas Gov. John Connally.

But they were both on a press bus in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963 – the day President John F. Kennedy was shot.

After 50 years of virtual silence, Austinite Julian Read recently opened up to KUT about his experience that day. 

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JFK Assassination: 50 Years Later
8:41 am
Thu November 21, 2013

Interview: 'All The Way' Playwright Robert Schenkkan on LBJ's Legacy

Robert Schenkkan visited KUT to talk about his play, "All the Way."
Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon for KUT News

Amid all the talk of JFK as we approach the 50th anniversary of his death, one could make the case that as tragic as the Kennedy assassination was, the accidental presidency of Kennedy's successor – Lyndon Baines Johnson – was far more consequential in reshaping the landscape of the United States.

Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Robert Schenkkan takes it even further in his new drama "All The Way." Actor Bryan Cranston of "Breaking Bad" fame plays LBJ – from the moment of his swearing in aboard Air Force One in 1963, to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Robert Schenkkan came to KUT's Newsmaker studio and spoke with David Brown.

Politics
11:19 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Interview: Should the U.S. Constitution Take a Cue From the States?

UT Law Professor Sanford Levinson's new book, "Framed: America's 51 Constitutions and the Crisis of Government," argues the Constitution should adapt to changing times.

What's so great about the U.S. Constitution anyway? Could Washington govern better if it weren't slavishly devoted to a deeply flawed document over 200-years-old?

These are some of the questions that Sanford Levinson asks in "Framed: America's 51 Constitutions and the Crisis of Government." The book comes out this month in paperback.

Levinson, a distinguished member of the UT Law faculty, spoke with KUT's David Brown about what can be done to better governing.

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Author Interviews
4:35 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

The Lair: The Story Behind the Story of the Teen Vampire Series

Emily McKay is the author of "The Lair," the sequel to "The Farm."
Emily Donahue, KUT News

Imagine a book about the future – a future where children are groomed to feed wild vampire-like beasts. A book with good guys who are bad guys, bad guys who retain a touch of humanity, and a few characters primed to save the world.

The Lair” is the second in a series of young adult books from Round Rock author Emily McKay. The first was “The Farm.”  Both are set in a post-apocalyptic future, in which adults have failed young people, and young people have adulthood thrust upon them.

McKay's vampires are neither glamorous nor elegant, but they are smarter, stronger and faster than humans. And in both “The Farm” and “The Lair,” human children are farmed to feed human/vampire Ticks.

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Breast Milk
1:06 pm
Fri October 25, 2013

Austin's Nonprofit Breast Milk Bank Needs Donations

Austin's breast milk bank launched a campaign this week to promote donations in the Austin area.
Mothers' Milk Bank at Austin

A report this week in the journal Pediatrics on the risks of  unregulated breast milk – covering sharing between friends, but also Internet sales – found three-fourths of the study samples were contaminated with bacteria.

The populations most at risk from such milk are newborns with significant health issues. They’re children like Nina DeGuire. Now a year old, she was born with a serious heart problem that required a series of surgeries and made it hard for her to take formula. Her mother Lani says she had no choice but to find donated breast milk.

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Austin Film Festival
10:34 am
Tue October 22, 2013

AFF Celebrates 20 Years in the Austin Film Community

Image courtesy the Austin Film Festival

Disclosure: KUT is a media sponsor of the Austin Film Festival.

The Austin Film Festival will kick off tomorrow tomorrow night. And, while this year's festival will screen some of the year's most talked-about films, such as the Coen Brothers' 'Inside Llewyn Davis,' Steve McQueen's '12 Years a Slave' and the star-studded 'August: Osage County,' the festival had humble beginnings. 

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Photojournalism
10:07 am
Mon September 23, 2013

Donna DeCesare's Unsettling Portraits of Children of War

Photo taken from the book "Unsettled."
Filipa Rodrigues for KUT News

Update: Donna DeCesare is one of four gold medal winners of the 2013 Maria Moors Cabot prize, awarded by the Columbia Journalism School for outstanding reporting on Latin America and the Caribbean. “The Cabot Prize honors journalists who have covered the Western Hemisphere and, through their reporting and editorial work, have furthered inter-American understanding,” reads a statement on the journalism school’s website.

You can see more of DeCesare’s work on her website.

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PolitiFact
6:05 am
Wed July 17, 2013

PolitiFact: How Well Do Food Stamps Work?

KUT's Emily Donahue sat down with PolitiFact Texas' Gardner Selby to see if U.S. Rep. Pete Gallego's claim that 97 percent of stamps are properly distributed.
KUT News

U.S. Rep. Pete Gallego, D-Alpine, recently said 97 percent of all food stamp benefits reach those in need – meaning the benefit program, which caters to those at or below the federal poverty level, has an error rate of only three percent.

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PolitiFact
6:20 am
Wed July 10, 2013

PolitiFact: Is Abortion the Second Most Common Surgery?

Gov. Rick Perry recently said that abortion is the second most common surgical procedure in the United States. But is abortion even medically considered surgery?
KUT News

Last week, Gov. Rick Perry said on a radio program that abortion was the second most common surgical procedure performed in the United States.

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PolitiFact
8:46 am
Wed July 3, 2013

PolitiFact: Do the Majority of Texans Support the Abortion Bill?

This week, KUT's Emily Donahue and The Austin American-Statesman's Gardner Selby discuss Land Commissioner Jerry Patterson's claim that the "majority" of Texans support Abortion regulation in Texas.
KUT News

As Lawmakers take up a abortion measure this week – we review comments made by State Land Commissioner Jerry Patterson aboutabortion measure Senate Bill 5 after it died at midnight at the end of the last special session. 

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Austin
3:29 pm
Fri June 28, 2013

What Does Attila The Hun Have to Do with Deep Space Exploration?

New thriller from best-selling author James Rollins, The Eye of God, merges scientific theory, cutting edge historical research and the origins of Christianity.
Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon for KUT News

What do you get when you mix Attila the Hun, deep space exploration and a the space-time continuum? For that answer you’d have to ask author James Rollins – whose new book, the Eye of God, has elements of all three.

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