Brad SeungJin Ryu

Intern for KUT News

Image Courtesy of opensource.com http://www.flickr.com/photos/opensourceway/4638981545/

After state and federal investigations started over the State Comptroller's office's exposure of personal information for over 3.5 million people, now an outside group is joining in.  Two lawyers of the Texas Civil Rights Project are asking a Travis County court to give them permission to investigate the security lapse.

In response to the legal actions taken by the Texas Civil Rights Project, Combs emailed her response to KUT via her spokesperson.

Photo by KUT News

Folks living in San Marcos will have to be careful how they use water, because of persistent dry conditions.

The City of San Marcos says that, because aquifer levels has dropped below average, they're preparing to implement Stage 1 Water Restrictions.

Photo by KUT News

Homeowners’ associations might not be able to turn the heat anymore on homeowners.

The Texas Senate passed SB 142, which restricts associations from exercising their rights to foreclose homeowners who didn’t pay dues and fees.

The bill, filed by State Senator Royce West (D-Dallas), aims to protect homeowners from potential abuse of foreclosure, especially on the families of soldiers serving overseas.

Image Courtesy of rankingranqueen http://www.flickr.com/photos/81343817@N00/399081880/sizes/l/in/photostream/

A budget deficit of $27 million has some people envisioning blackjack tables and penny slots in the parts of South and East Texas. Casino lobbyists are working overtime right now. But is the shortfall enough to put a tax on things like coal or making people pay a fee for driving cars that don't pass fuel efficiency standards?

The Texas League of Conservation Voters hopes so. The environmental policy lobby group calls this "green revenue."  They laid out some suggestions today at a press  conference held at the State Capitol.

Photo by Ariel Gutierrez for the Mexican Federal Government, http://flickr.com/photos/30118979@N03/4944508417/

In response to public concerns toward Mexico facing a series of drug-related violence, Mexico’s security spokesperson, is coming to UT to discuss Mexico’s national strategies for public safety.  Alejandro Poiré, will speak at noon Monday at the Bass Lecture Hall of the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs.

Poiré will discuss ways Mexico is dealing with ongoing drug-related violence that threatens Americans who live along the border, as well as those who travel to Mexico.

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