Ashley Lopez

Ways to Connect

Miguel Guitierrez Jr./KUT

It’s only been about three weeks since the Federal Drug Administration changed the label for the country’s most widely used abortion drug, mifepristone. In Texas, advocates expected this would be a big deal, because Texas law mandates physicians administer the drug exactly like it says on the label—even though those methods weren’t common medical practice.


Chan Lone/Texas Tribune

There are fewer children in Texas without health insurance these days, but the state still has one of the highest rates of uninsured children in the country. And according to a new study, certain races and ethnicities in the state are more likely than others to be uninsured.


via Texas Tribune

State government has been slow to respond to a rise in opioid deaths in Texas. But, with an ongoing epidemic in the state, university students have taken things into their own hands. Last week, they convinced the University of Texas System to change its own medical amnesty policy.


Michael Stravato, via Texas Tribune

Starting this morning, Texas lawmakers will spend two days discussing the state’s Medicaid program. On the docket is a look at services and ways to cut costs, but there's a big question looming in the discussion of whether a big chunk of that Medicaid money will even be there next year.

Calafellvalo via Flickr

Believe it or not, Texas is not among a short list of states that prohibits fetal tissue research. Advocates and researchers say that’s a good thing, because Texas is among a list of states that would be affected if the Zika virus makes it into the U.S. mosquito population. 


Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon for KUT News

A simple label-change from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration could have a sweeping impact on access to medication abortions in Texas. The federal agency announced on Wednesday it’s updating how the pill — not an emergency contraceptive like Plan B, but a medication taken to induce abortions — should be administered.


Jorge Sanhueza Lyon/KUT

Despite the excitement and wall-to-wall media coverage of this year’s presidential nominating contests, Texas still had one of the lowest voter participation rates during this year’s primaries – about 21 percent. 

Some Texans are trying to fix this problem by innovating the way we administer elections here in the Lone Star State.

Miguel Guitierrez Jr. for KUT News

For many women in Texas, abortions are getting harder to obtain.

The cost of the procedure is increasing, and so are the distances people have to travel to get one.

For some, that’s making it almost impossible to get an abortion, but there are groups here in Austin working to transport women to clinics far from home and help them cover the costs.


MIguel Gutierrez Jr. for KUT News

More than half of Texas’ abortion clinics have closed in the past few years, thanks to the state’s controversial abortion law House Bill 2. As a result, the distance some women have to travel to get the procedure has increased fourfold. That’s according to a new study from the Texas Policy Evaluation Project.

Todd Wiseman for the Texas Tribune

Hospitals around the state are in a serious time crunch. Administrators are currently drafting their budgets for the next fiscal year, but a big chunk of federal funds they’ve relied on in years past isn’t a sure thing this time around.


James Gathany/CDC

Mosquito season is looming and Texas public health officials are preparing for the possibility of the Zika virus infecting the state’s mosquito population. Following missteps during the Ebola crisis in Dallas less than two years ago, officials say they are applying what they learned during that ordeal to a new infectious disease threat.


Texas Tribune

Pretty much everyone on Medicaid here in Texas receives care through a Medicaid Managed Care Program. It’s a big program serving the state’s most vulnerable populations, but there are some big problems. Mostly, there aren’t enough doctors taking part in the program to help serve these populations, and state lawmakers are trying to address that. 


Allison Shelley via Texas Tribune

The U.S. Supreme Court is blocking a Louisiana law that requires doctors who perform abortions to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital. Friday’s decision came just days after the court heard oral arguments regarding a similar Texas law. And the ruling points to the larger ramifications of an expected ruling on the Texas case before the court.

Ilana Panich-Linsman for KUT News

Texas’ March 1 primary was the first time the state’s controversial voter ID law was in place during a presidential nominating contest.


Pu Ying-Huang/KUT News

The University of Texas is preparing to search for a new Dean for its Architecture School. Outgoing Dean Fritz Steiner recently announced he was leaving his post ahead of a new statewide law allowing permitted gun owners to carry a concealed handgun on campus.  

Miguel Guitierrez Jr./KUT

On Wednesday, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments for Whole Women’s Health v. Hellerstedt. The case is a challenge to a controversial Texas law proponents say makes abortions safer in the state. It could set new limits for what kind of regulations state lawmakers can impose on abortion providers.


Miguel Gutierrez Jr. for KUT News

Thousands attended a somewhat-impromptu campaign stop at Circuit of the Americas in Austin Saturday to see Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, who is running for the Democratic presidential nomination.

The Sanders campaign announced Thursday afternoon that they were holding a rally in Texas this weekend. They'd also make a campaign stop in Dallas Saturday afternoon. For many in the crowd, seeing Sanders in Austin was a big surprise.


Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon for KUT News

This year’s presidential election is in full swing, and the state's voter ID law in full effect. But, believe it or not, there are no stats on how many legal voters are being kept from the polls because they don't have a photo ID. Nearly five years after the state’s law was passed, nobody seems to know how to come up with a number.


Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon for KUT News

Today is the last day of early voting in Texas. Democratic presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders are hoping to engage Latino voters ahead of the state’s March 1 primary.

There are some big differences between the campaigns, though.


Todd Wiseman for the Texas Tribune

Texas’ nursing home and elder care industry got a hard look by a state health panel Thursday. Lawmakers and stakeholders discussed whether state regulators are being tough enough on nursing homes that are out of compliance with state and federal standards.

Pages