Andrew Weber

Web Producer

Andrew Weber is a web producer for KUT News. A graduate of St. Edward's University with a degree in English, Andrew has previously interned with The Texas Tribune, The Austin American-Statesman and KOOP Radio.

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Photo Illustration by Andrew Weber, Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Austin’s got a checkered past when it comes to digital road signs. The blinking roadway signs have been hacked a few times in the past to warn of zombies, to taunt the OU Sooners and to even pay tribute to the meme-launching death of Harambe. But the City of Austin Transportation Department has decided to harness that creative energy for good, by allowing anyone to submit safe-for-work language for road signs starting today.

YouTube

Last October, Austin made history under a shroud of secrecy, it seems.

Today, Google’s parent company Alphabet announced its intention to bring driverless cars to the open market in a new endeavor called Waymo – a project that, according to the company, had its first successful, truly driverless test on Austin’s roads. 

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Today is runoff election day in the Austin area. You'll be forgiven if you didn't even know there was a runoff election.

Only about 3 percent of registered voters cast a ballot during the early voting period. If you vote today, you'll likely just see two races on the ballot – both for places on the Austin Community College board of trustees. But for those who live in northwest Austin, there’s a third race – this one for city council.

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

A new app’s looking to improve rides for Austin cyclists by using crowdsourced input on roads. Ride Report tracks a user’s bike route and surveys them on road and safety conditions after their ride’s concluded.

The app allows Austinites to plan trips throughout the city, providing suggestions on the best possible routes and conditions based on aggregate user data. After each ride, you can rate your commute “great” or “not great,” and those ratings feed the app’s so-called “stress map,” which color codes the best and worst roads and trails in the city according to the data. 

Audrey McGlinchy / KUT

Austin voters in five of the city’s 10 districts have decided who will represent them on the city council. This includes districts 2, 4, 6, 7 and 10 – Southeast and most of North Austin. Austinites will also the fate of the $720 million transportation bond. 

10:44 p.m. – In District 7, Council Member Leslie Pool holds a 73 percent lead over challenger Natalie Gauldin, who's garnered 27 percent of the vote with 48 percent of Election Day votes counted.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Members of the public have weighed in on Mayor Steve Adler’s $720 million transportation bond proposal, and Council members have taken the first two of three votes needed to officially put the bond on a November ballot.

If voters approve the bond measure, it would mean an increase in property taxes of about $5 a month for the average homeowner in Austin.

So, what would the bond buy, exactly?


Starting in 1869, the timeline below chronicles past floods that hit the Austin area.

Austin History Center

Today's Wayback Wednesday looks back at Austin's onetime Victorian-era literary magazine, The Rolling Stone. The DIY-minded rag published short stories, cartoons and other Onion-esque items, but it is largely known as the first creative sandbox for its publisher, William Sydney Porter.

Porter, a North Carolina transplant who moved to Austin in the late 1880s, worked as a druggist and as a clerk at the General Land Office before he took a job at the First National Bank as a teller. It was during his time as a teller that he started The Rolling Stone in 1894. 

Courtesy of Jesse Sublett

Today’s podcast edition of Wayback Wednesday starts, like many Texas stories, with football. It also ends with football, but in the middle it’s got most of the things those other football stories don’t have: an amazing crime spree, with burglaries, bare-knuckle brawling, prostitution, federal investigations and a couple of murders. And it all starts with a kid from East Austin named Timmy Overton.

Texas History Center

In honor of Texas Independence Day, this week we’re looking back at the mystery of the Texas Constitution. 

The mystery being that, after 180 years, it doesn't technically have one in effect, because the State of Texas has never formally recognized one of the many versions of its constitution.


Steve Hopson, via WikiMedia Creative Commons

Thirty-five years ago Thursday, the Armadillo World Headquarters was on its last leg.

After a decade on the scene, Eddie Wilson's legendary club had one last blowout to bookend its time at the forefront of Austin's live music scene, culminating in a New Year's Eve party on December 31, 1980.

Texas Archive of the Moving Image

The “Star Wars” hype machine is in full effect.

It’s impossible to look at any screen without seeing something plugging the latest reboot of the space opera, “Star Wars: The Force Awakens,” which hits Austin theaters tomorrow night. But, a long time ago in the wake of Alderaan’s untimely end, before Luke lost a hand and before George Lucas’ prequel trilogy took the franchise far, far away from its roots, some of the original film’s key players sat down with Austin’s own Carolyn Jackson to talk about the film.

YouTube/Uber

Austin City Council members are considering regulations for ridesharing companies Uber and Lyft. If passed, the City would collect fees from these companies, and also impose fingerprint-based background checks on drivers. On Thursday, Uber launched a campaign against the Council member who initiated these regulations.


C. Jung, P.B. Allen, A.D. Ellington/Nature Nanotechnology

Imagine a test that could tell you instantly whether or not you had a case of strep throat, or just a bad cold. No doctors. No waiting. No hassle.

That’s the idea behind research from UT Austin’s Ellington Lab, published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology. The so-called “DNA walker” developed by Cheulhee Jung, Peter Allen and Andrew Ellington isn’t the first ever created – DNA walkers are fairly common in nanotechnology – but its mechanics are different than any other ever devised.

Texas Portal to History

Believe it or not, this month is Passport Awareness Month – the two-fortnight campaign in which the State Department encourages citizens to renew or apply for their passports. At worst, it’ll take six weeks to get a passport; at best, three weeks.

Wally Gobetz/flickr

After 82 years in the shadow of the school’s iconic tower, the University of Texas removed the controversial Jefferson Davis statue yesterday from its Main Mall.

The university also removed the statue of Woodrow Wilson. 


Marjorie Kamys Cotera/Texas Tribune

Attorney General Ken Paxton has been in the headlines a lot as of recent. Not in the way his predecessor and current boss Greg Abbott used to (typically, by announcing that he was suing the federal government), but rather by vowing to fight against indictments on three securities fraud felonies for actions he took during his time as a state senator.

The Wilson Quarterly

This afternoon, the Austin City Council’s Public Utilities Committee and Health and Human Services Committee are both taking on an issue that’s trickled through, and sometimes flooded, City Hall: fluoridation of water.

The issue’s prevalence has ebbed and flowed over the years in city politics, but two Austinites, both with the surname Taylor, at opposite ends of the spectrum helped water fluoridation boil over into the national spotlight.

UT Austin's Briscoe Center

After months of controversy swirling around the statues memorializing Confederate leaders on UT’s campus, the group tasked with helping President Greg Fenves decide their ultimate fate handed up their recommendations on Monday.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT News

The group tasked with providing solutions to the controversy surrounding statues of Confederate figures on the University of Texas at Austin campus has submitted its suggestions to the school’s president, Gregory Fenves.

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