Andrew Schneider, KUHF News

Andrew Schneider/Houston Public Media

Public radio stations from across the state collaborated on this series looking at the death penalty in Texas – its history, how it's changed, whom it affects and its future. The following story is from Houston Public Media:

Texas is set to carry out its second execution of the year this week, barring a last minute reprieve. There are another seven planned by July. The use of the death penalty has been on the decline in Texas in recent years. But one state representative from Houston has made it his mission to end it all together.*

Florian Martin / KUHF

At the height of the battle over Houston’s Equal Rights Ordinance, Mayor Annise Parker subpoenaed the sermons of five pastors leading the fight to repeal the measure. Even though HERO is now history, Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick is determined to keep this from happening again.

Al Ortiz / Houston Public Media

Joan Cunningham grew up in Canada and remembers watching people vote the old fashioned way: Fill out a paper ballot, drop it in a box. She understands electronic voting machines can be more efficient.


Gage Skidmore via Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

The latest Texas Lyceum poll shows Hillary Clinton just seven points behind Donald Trump in this reliably red state. That’s unusually close. Republican presidential candidates have carried the state by double digits in every contest since 1996. Democrats are hoping Trump’s presence at the top of the GOP ticket will help them in down-ballot races as well.


Teresa Vieira for KUT News

Midsize companies — firms with annual revenues of $10 million to $1 billion dollars — are now adding jobs at almost double the national average.

Middle market companies account for just 0.5% of all Texas businesses. But they employ 30% of the state’s workforce. Anil Makhija teaches finance at Ohio State University. He says midsized businesses are more reliable job creators than small ones.

“If you think about small firms, they do deserve our attention, because they are frequently the centers of innovation. But they have a very high failure rate.”