News

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

Last week, Austin ISD released a proposal that suggests building an elementary school on a 10-acre tract in the Mueller neighborhood. That surprised a lot of people involved in the discussion, which has been going on for the past year, and last week’s conversations show just how delicate this situation is.

Cherrywood resident Jennifer Potter-Miller has a child in first grade at Maplewood Elementary. She has another child about to enter kindergarten and she wants to send her kid to public school. But, she has no idea where her kids will go once they get to middle school.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

If you’ve paid attention to the results of this year’s presidential election, you’ve probably heard a lot about the Electoral College.

It’s how Donald Trump was elected president, even though he lost the national vote by more than two million votes. But most of us don’t know exactly what the electoral college is, or why we have it.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Remember how excited you were during early voting? How excited you were about the possibility of the most contentious election in a generation finally, mercifully coming to an end? Guess what? If you live in Central Texas, you can revisit that feeling starting today.

The Writer’s Almanac with Garrison Keillor educates, entertains and inspires with brief facts and poetry related to each day's date. It celebrates the birthdays and works of poets, writers, composers, philosophers and historical figures.  It is heard Monday through Friday evenings at 8:01 p.m. on KUT 90.5. On weekends you can find the Writer’s Almanac right here on KUT.org each morning at 8. Find more information and other shows at http://writersalmanac.org/

    

  

Do you sense that you understand things better when you read them or hear them? Do you learn better via words or images? Are there really even different learning "styles" at all? In this week's episode of KUT's podcast Higher Ed, KUT's Jennifer Stayton and Southwestern University President Dr. Ed Burger explore a listener's question about learning styles.


Todd Wiseman, Texas Tribune

From the Texas Tribune:

Thousands of Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller's followers on social media might believe that terrorists are — in his words —preparing "for their jihad against the state and our nation” from a training compound outside of Houston.

The Writer’s Almanac with Garrison Keillor educates, entertains and inspires with brief facts and poetry related to each day's date. It celebrates the birthdays and works of poets, writers, composers, philosophers and historical figures.  It is heard Monday through Friday evenings at 8:01 p.m. on KUT 90.5. On weekends you can find the Writer’s Almanac right here on KUT.org each morning at 8. Find more information and other shows at http://writersalmanac.org/

    

  

Bob Daemmrich/Texas Tribune

A board of lawmakers has given final approval for $150 million in funding to help pull the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services out of its crisis mode — but there are strings attached. 

In a letter dated Thursday, the Legislative Budget Board has given the agency the go-ahead to hire 829 new caseworkers and give $12,000 raises to existing ones. The funding includes $142.4 million in state dollars and $7.6 million in federal money. 

prettyinprint/Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Willie Nelson may have sung it best :

I saw miles and miles of Texas, all the stars up in the sky

I saw miles and miles of Texas, gonna live here till I die

Pexels (CC0)

From Texas Standard:

On Jan. 4, 2016, 16-year-old David Molak killed himself. The San Antonio teen had undergone extensive cyberbullying.

Austin Police Department

The City of Austin has reached a legal settlement with a police officer who was fired for killing unarmed black teenager David Joseph in February.

Courtesy of Hospice Austin

This week we’ve partnered with Hospice Austin and StoryCorps to hear stories of loss and grieving from people who have been involved with hospice care at the end of life.

Today, we hear from Gretchen Baker – a volunteer with Hospice Austin.

KUT Weekend brings you our favorite stories from the KUT newsroom. Updated Fridays.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Charles Urdy, 82, met his first wife at Charlie’s Playhouse, a now-shuttered club on E. 11th Street in Austin.

“I just walked in,” said Urdy, a former Austin City Council member and professor at Huston-Tillotson University. “A friend of mine and his girlfriend and this young lady were sitting at a table together. And I just walked in.”

Daniel Reese for KUT News

To say President-elect Donald Trump's incoming administration has public health and environmental advocates worried may be an understatement.  Like a lot of Republicans, Trump wants to roll back environmental protections and some people are already protesting his positions in the streets.

But, beyond protest, how will these groups push their agendas under the next administration? 

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

High-end apartments have come to dominate the rental market in downtown Austin. A few years ago, those developments saw a sharp drop in occupancy as new units flooded the market, but the market seems to be on its way to stabilizing.

DVIDSHUB/Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Nearly one million military reservists have deployed around the world since Sept. 11, 2001, according to the Pentagon's Defense Manpower Data Center. Many of those reservists and Guard members rely on receiving benefits under the GI Bill once they return from abroad.

  

From Little Artist Big Artist, this month's Get Involved spotlight non-profit:

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

Despite the results of this year’s election, there are still Republicans who say the party needs to appeal to a more diverse group of voters if they want to win the White House in the future. Specifically, they say the party needs to attract Hispanic voters.

And the case study some Republicans are pointing to when they make this argument is solidly-red Texas.

Photo by KUT News

The Austin Independent School District is starting to think about what its schools will look like, and where they’ll be located, two decades from now. On Wednesday, it released a set of possible options for its 120 campuses this week, including when and where to potentially renovate schools, build new ones and close others. 

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