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The Warriors: A Love Story, from ARCOS Dance, isn't an easy show to sum up, even for its creators. It's a multimedia piece, using all the arrows in the ARCOS quiver: film, interactive video projections, live and recorded music, dance, theatrical elements, text, and narration. They've worked to make all those elements work together, though, "in a way that doesn't feel like there are multiple media; we try to make it feel like as immersive an experience as possible for the audience," says co-director Eliot Gray Fisher.

Image via facebook/7chinesebrothers

In the U.S. entertainment industry, there’s LA, there’s New York, and then there’s Texas — at least that’s what a lot of us have gotten used to hearing. But how far away is Texas from actually being that “third coast” in the biz? And what do new reductions in film incentives to do that image?

Todd Wiseman/Texas Tribune

Today, Sept. 1, marks the legal start for more than 600 new state laws for Texans to follow. From healthcare to transportation to education and public safety, there’s something that affects everyone in the Lone Star State.


From Austin Parks Foundation, this month's Get Involved spotlight organization:

Austin Parks Foundation is devoted to connecting people to parks. Since its establishment in 1992, Austin Parks Foundation has focused on developing partnerships that foster on development and maintenance of Austin’s treasured parks, trails and public green spaces. Austin Parks Foundation focuses on volunteerism, park activation, community resources, sustainability projects, and public-private partnerships.

Todd Wiseman, Damian Gadal, Robert Couse-Baker/Texas Tribune

The system Texas uses to pay for public schools was back in court today, and lawyers on both sides argued over whether the system is constitutional. It's an argument that's been going on for more than thirty years.

This particular case started in 2011, when the state legislature cut more than $5 billion from public education. Two-thirds of Texas school districts sued the state, arguing the cuts made it impossible to meet state academic standards. They won in a lower court. But today, the case was argued in the state Supreme Court.


What Happens If Barton Creek Mall Closes?

Sep 1, 2015
Miguel Gutierrez Jr./KUT

In some U.S. cities, shopping malls are a thing of the past. For the malls that are surviving, about one-fifth have vacancy rates that experts consider "troubling.”

Austin's own Highland Mall went that way: It recently closed and was converted into a community college campus. But what about the city's other big indoor mall?


Image via flickr/Cayusa (CC BY-NC 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

Since the televised murder of two reporters last week in Virginia, a 17-year-old was killed in a shooting near an elementary school in southwest Houston, a police officer was shot and killed in Sunset, Louisiana, when he tried to intervene in a violent domestic dispute, and an on-campus shooting at Texas Southern University injured one person.

Kathryn Decker/flickr

Have you ever applied for a job where they ask you to check a box if you have a criminal record?

Over the summer, Austin's District 4 City Council member Greg Casar put together a group to look for ways Austin businesses could change that practice, or, “ban the box.”


Wally Gobetz/flickr

After 82 years in the shadow of the school’s iconic tower, the University of Texas removed the controversial Jefferson Davis statue yesterday from its Main Mall.

The university also removed the statue of Woodrow Wilson. 


Callie Richmond/Texas Tribune

The Texas Moving Image Industry Incentive Program offers grants for companies who hire Texans for projects in-state. The Coen Brothers' True Grit was filmed in Texas, largely due to the state's incentives.


Blue Bell Returns to Austin

Aug 31, 2015
flickr.com/dmachiavello

Today’s the day.

After a months-long hiatus, Blue Bell Ice Cream returns to some Austin stores’ freezer aisles. The Brenham-based creamery halted production in April after listeria-contaminated products were linked to deaths in Kansas.

UT Removes Controversial Jefferson Davis Statue

Aug 30, 2015
Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT

After months of debate over its presence on UT-Austin's campus, the Jefferson Davis statue on the school's Main Mall was removed this morning. 

The statue of the president of the Confederate States of America will be relocated to the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History as part of an educational exhibit. The university also removed the Woodrow Wilson statue, and will relocate somewhere that has yet to be determined.

Tamir Khalifa/Texas Tribune

Gov. Greg Abbott on Friday endorsed new laws to further tighten restrictions on Texas abortion providers, including a proposal that likely would bar fetal tissue donation.

Ryan McRimmon/Texas Tribune

The Texas Attorney General’s Office is asking for a restraining order against an unlicensed assisted living facility in Austin. The AG’s Office says it was alerted by the Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services about Zoe’s Safe Place on Burnet Road, and the office’s request for an injunction alleges that Zoe’s Safe Place and its founder have violated the Texas Health & Safety Code, threatening the health and safety of its residents.

Veronica Zaragovia/KUT

Austin has a new synagogue — well, it's new to Austin. It’s actually the oldest synagogue built in Texas.

Orthodox Jews who emigrated from Lithuania to Brenham gathered in this synagogue built in 1893. Over the decades that followed, the Jewish community in that area dwindled. 

What's Wrong With Rewarding Mediocrity?

Aug 28, 2015

Kids these days typically get a trophy for participation in most events. Some argue that the practice ultimately serves as a disincentive for a child to compete. Others ask, if your kid is smiling, what more do you want?

In this week's edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke look into the system of reward and evaluate what we are rewarding and why.

Photo by KUT News

There’s no shortage of people who oppose the prospect of the general public carrying firearms on the University of Texas campus. UT-Austin and public universities across Texas are trying to balance those concerns against the Legislature’s mandate. At a rally yesterday, chants of “Gun Free UT!” were mingled with displays from supporters of the “campus carry” law.

KUT Weekend brings you our favorite stories from the KUT newsroom. Updated Fridays!

Miguel Gutierrez Jr./KUT News

Ten years ago tomorrow, Hurricane Katrina made landfall and displaced thousands along the Gulf Coast. Many of the storm’s survivors came to Austin, to the Austin Convention Center. Timothy Jones was one of the displaced, but his first home in Austin wasn’t the convention center. It was a hospital and now, a decade later, he’s still recovering from his own trauma the storm left in its wake.

Leslie Boorhem-Stephenson/Texas Tribune

The statue of Confederate President Jefferson Davis on the University of Texas at Austin campus will soon be removed from its prominent place on campus. 

Removal plans were cleared Thursday by a state district judge, who rejected a request from the Sons of Confederate Veterans to block UT-Austin’s plan to remove the bronze sculpture.

The Confederate group had argued that the statue has significant artistic and cultural value and could be damaged if removed. Lawyers for UT-Austin disputed that, but also said that the Sons Confederate Veterans didn’t have standing to sue.

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