Annette Strauss Institute http://kut.org en The Life of the Civic Party: Austin-Based Institute Works to Get People More Involved http://kut.org/post/life-civic-party-austin-based-institute-works-get-people-more-involved <p>Voting in elections. Volunteering. Calling up elected officials. All ways to be civically involved. All things that Texans don't exactly do in large numbers.</p><p>A study earlier this year by the <a href="http://moody.utexas.edu/strauss">Annette Strauss Institute for Civic Life</a> at the University of Texas at Austin found Texas ranks near the bottom on almost every aspect of civic engagement. The state's civic health is bad. The Institute is gathering people together Saturday, Nov. 9, to try to come up with some good medicine.</p><p>Institute Director Regina Lawrence talked with KUT's Jennifer Stayton before the conference about how to best get people off the civic sidelines and into the game:</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/119034569" width="100%"></iframe></p><p> Fri, 08 Nov 2013 13:59:35 +0000 Jennifer Stayton 9135 at http://kut.org The Life of the Civic Party: Austin-Based Institute Works to Get People More Involved Could 'Respect' Instead of 'Like' Lead to More Civil Discourse Online? http://kut.org/post/could-respect-instead-lead-more-civil-discourse-online <p dir="ltr" id="docs-internal-guid-72aef0ed-b8bc-51fd-3132-0f509d67b6af" style="line-height:1.15;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:0pt;"><span style="font-size:15px;font-family:Arial;color:#000000;background-color:transparent;font-weight:normal;font-style:normal;font-variant:normal;text-decoration:none;vertical-align:baseline;">When it comes to news, what do you like?</span></p><p dir="ltr" style="line-height:1.15;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:0pt;"><span style="font-size:15px;font-family:Arial;color:#000000;background-color:transparent;font-weight:normal;font-style:normal;font-variant:normal;text-decoration:none;vertical-align:baseline;">We all tend to gravitate toward the things we like and avoid the things we don’t but, according to UT Professor <a href="http://commstudies.utexas.edu/faculty/rhetoric-and-language/natalie-jomini-stroud">Natalie Stroud</a>, that’s bad news for democracy. As director of the <a href="http://engagingnewsproject.org/">Engaging News Project</a>, Stroud has come up with an intriguing proposition: What if we replace the ‘like’ button with a ‘respect’ button? </span></p><p><br /><span style="font-size:15px;font-family:Arial;color:#000000;background-color:transparent;font-weight:normal;font-style:normal;font-variant:normal;text-decoration:none;vertical-align:baseline;">Stroud spoke with KUT’s David Brown on the Engaging News Project’s recent experiment.</span></p><p dir="ltr" style="line-height:1.15;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:0pt;"><span style="font-size:15px;font-family:Arial;color:#000000;background-color:transparent;font-weight:normal;font-style:normal;font-variant:normal;text-decoration:none;vertical-align:baseline;"><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F115352105" width="100%"></iframe></span></p><p> Tue, 22 Oct 2013 14:29:17 +0000 David Brown 8935 at http://kut.org Could 'Respect' Instead of 'Like' Lead to More Civil Discourse Online?