Terrence Henry http://kut.org en How One Austin Home Produces More Energy Than It Uses http://kut.org/post/how-one-austin-home-produces-more-energy-it-uses <p style="font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); margin-bottom: 15px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; outline: rgb(0, 0, 0); vertical-align: baseline; background: transparent;"><strong><a href="http://stateimpact.npr.org/texas/2014/07/14/reducing-pollution-through-energy-efficiency/">From StateImpact Texas</a>:</strong></p><p style="font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); margin-bottom: 15px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; outline: rgb(0, 0, 0); vertical-align: baseline; background: transparent;">As the mercury rises in Texas, so does our energy use. Air conditioners will work overtime to keep your house cool. And when that happens, the Texas grid can become stretched thin.</p><p style="font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); margin-bottom: 15px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; outline: rgb(0, 0, 0); vertical-align: baseline; background: transparent;">One solution is to build more power plants to meet growing demand. Another is to simply get Texans to use less energy.</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/158591118&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p> Mon, 14 Jul 2014 18:40:13 +0000 Terrence Henry 10782 at http://kut.org How One Austin Home Produces More Energy Than It Uses Proposals to Prevent Another Fertilizer Explosion Immediately Meet Resistance http://kut.org/post/proposals-prevent-another-fertilizer-explosion-immediately-meet-resistance <p style="margin-bottom: 15px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 16px; line-height: 24px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(68, 68, 68);"><a href="http://stateimpact.npr.org/texas/?p=37634">From StateImpact Texas:&nbsp;</a></p><p style="margin-bottom: 15px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 16px; line-height: 24px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(68, 68, 68);">The explosion at a fertilizer plant in the small town of West, Texas last year took much more than fifteen lives. At least 262 people were injured; twenty percent of those were&nbsp;<a href="http://www.dallasnews.com/news/west-explosion/investigation/20140624-20-of-west-victims-who-sought-emergency-care-had-brain-injuries.ece" style="color: rgb(23, 78, 130); -webkit-transition: all 0.2s ease-in-out; transition: all 0.2s ease-in-out; font-weight: bold;">brain injuries</a>. Homes and schools were destroyed. But judging from the response of some state lawmakers charged with stopping it from happening again, disasters like the one in West are just something Texans are going to have to live with from time to time.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 15px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 16px; line-height: 24px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(68, 68, 68);">There’s been&nbsp;<a href="http://stateimpact.npr.org/texas/2014/04/17/whats-being-done-to-prevent-another-west/" style="color: rgb(23, 78, 130); -webkit-transition: all 0.2s ease-in-out; transition: all 0.2s ease-in-out; font-weight: bold;">no new regulations for fertilizer plants&nbsp;</a>since the disaster until this month, but there’s been a&nbsp;<a href="http://stateimpact.npr.org/texas/2013/04/22/after-west-fertilizer-explosion-concerns-over-safety-regulation-and-zoning/" style="color: rgb(23, 78, 130); -webkit-transition: all 0.2s ease-in-out; transition: all 0.2s ease-in-out; font-weight: bold;">consensus for some time&nbsp;</a>about how to prevent another tragedy like the one in West: require fertilizer plants to store ammonium nitrate in non-combustible facilities or to use sprinklers; conduct inspections of facilities; and train first responders so they know how to deal with fires that may break out at sites with ammonium nitrate.&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/157004615&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p> Wed, 02 Jul 2014 17:30:27 +0000 Terrence Henry 10720 at http://kut.org Proposals to Prevent Another Fertilizer Explosion Immediately Meet Resistance Rising Oil and Gas Boom Does Little for Poor in Texas http://kut.org/post/rising-oil-and-gas-boom-does-little-poor-texas <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="373" id="nyt_video_player" marginheight="0" marginwidth="0" scrolling="no" src="http://graphics8.nytimes.com/bcvideo/1.0/iframe/embed.html?videoId=100000002935203&amp;playerType=embed" title="New York Times Video - Embed Player" width="480"></iframe></p><p style="margin-bottom: 15px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 16px; line-height: 24px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(68, 68, 68);"><strong><a href="http://stateimpact.npr.org/texas/2014/06/30/rising-oil-and-gas-boom-does-little-for-poor-in-texas/">From StateImpact&nbsp;Texas:&nbsp;</a></strong></p><p style="margin-bottom: 15px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 16px; line-height: 24px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(68, 68, 68);">When it comes to the oil and gas drilling boom in the country, Texas is king. Actually, make that crown a global one: over a quarter of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.bizjournals.com/dallas/news/2014/06/27/texas-rules-the-oil-and-gas-world-with-one-quarter.html" style="color: rgb(23, 78, 130); -webkit-transition: all 0.2s ease-in-out; transition: all 0.2s ease-in-out; font-weight: bold;">all the active drilling rigs in the </a><a href="http://www.bizjournals.com/dallas/news/2014/06/27/texas-rules-the-oil-and-gas-world-with-one-quarter.html" style="color: rgb(23, 78, 130); -webkit-transition: all 0.2s ease-in-out; transition: all 0.2s ease-in-out; font-weight: bold;">world</a>are right here in the Lone Star State.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 15px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 16px; line-height: 24px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(68, 68, 68);">The boom – taking place thanks to hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” and horizontal drilling –&nbsp;has brought jobs, money and more energy security to Texas and the country. It’s also damaged roads, increased traffic and accidents, strained local governments and caused housing prices to skyrocket in parts of the state. How the boom is leaving some communities behind is the subject of an&nbsp;<a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/30/us/boom-meets-bust-in-texas-atop-sea-of-oil-poverty-digs-in.html" style="color: rgb(23, 78, 130); -webkit-transition: all 0.2s ease-in-out; transition: all 0.2s ease-in-out; font-weight: bold;">in-depth report</a>&nbsp;today in&nbsp;<em style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">The</em>&nbsp;<em style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">New York Times</em>.</p><p> Mon, 30 Jun 2014 17:01:00 +0000 Terrence Henry 10705 at http://kut.org How New Transmission Lines Are Bringing More Wind Power to Texas Cities http://kut.org/post/how-new-transmission-lines-are-bringing-more-wind-power-texas-cities <p style="margin-bottom: 15px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 16px; line-height: 24px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(68, 68, 68);"><a href="http://stateimpact.npr.org/texas/2014/06/26/how-new-transmission-lines-are-bringing-more-wind-power-to-texas-cities/"><strong>From StateImpact Texas</strong>:</a></p><p style="margin-bottom: 15px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 16px; line-height: 24px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(68, 68, 68);">We’re all going to be paying for it, so you might be glad to know that a new set of transmission lines to bring wind power from the Panhandle and West Texas to folks in North and Central Texas appear to be off to a good start. According to a&nbsp;<a href="http://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.cfm?id=16831" style="color: rgb(23, 78, 130); -webkit-transition: all 0.2s ease-in-out; transition: all 0.2s ease-in-out; font-weight: bold;">new federal analysis</a>&nbsp;this week, the Competitive Renewable Energy Zones power transmission project, also known as CREZ, is already resulting in fewer curtailments of wind power and more even prices in Texas’ energy market.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 15px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 16px; line-height: 24px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(68, 68, 68);">The project<a href="file:///Users/th24683/Downloads/Quarterly_Report_April_2014_V2.pdf" style="color: rgb(23, 78, 130); -webkit-transition: all 0.2s ease-in-out; transition: all 0.2s ease-in-out; font-weight: bold;">&nbsp;cost $7 billion</a>, a price that will be paid for by tacking on a fee to Texans’ utility bills. On average, your power bill could go up several dollars a month.</p><p> Thu, 26 Jun 2014 17:42:34 +0000 Terrence Henry 10685 at http://kut.org How New Transmission Lines Are Bringing More Wind Power to Texas Cities Searching for More Specifics on Austin's Urban Rail Proposal http://kut.org/post/searching-more-specifics-austins-urban-rail-proposal <p><em style="line-height: 1.5;">Disclosure: Project Connect is a sponsor of&nbsp;KUT.</em></p><p>When was the last time you were at Highland Mall? For many&nbsp;Austinites, the retail ghost town isn’t on their hot list of places to hang out. But city planners are counting on that to change, and they’re willing to place a bet on it, to the tune of $1.4 billion.</p><p>That’s the estimated price tag for the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.projectconnect.com/sites/default/files/Central%20Corridor%20Urban%20Rail%20Recommendation%20050214.pdf">urban rail line</a>&nbsp;recommended by&nbsp;<a href="http://www.projectconnect.com/">Project Connect</a>, a group of regional transit agencies working on mass transportation. To justify it, Project Connect has&nbsp;<a href="http://keepaustinwonky.wordpress.com/2014/06/02/letter-to-council-on-project-connects-transparency/">projected explosive growth around Highland Mall</a>, at a rate much faster than the city of Austin as a whole is projected to grow over the coming decades.</p><p>How did Project Connect come up with these numbers?&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/154123230&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p> Fri, 13 Jun 2014 16:30:20 +0000 Terrence Henry 10590 at http://kut.org Searching for More Specifics on Austin's Urban Rail Proposal Why is Project Connect Handing Out This Inaccurate Urban Rail Map? http://kut.org/post/why-project-connect-handing-out-inaccurate-urban-rail-map <p><em style="line-height: 1.5;">Disclosure: Project Connect is a sponsor of&nbsp;KUT.&nbsp;</em></p><p><strong style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 15px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Georgia, Times, serif; line-height: 22px;">Update</strong><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Georgia, Times, serif; font-size: 15px; line-height: 22px;">: Project Connect has issued a new flyer. Scroll to the bottom of this post to read it.&nbsp;</span></p><p><strong>Original story:</strong> If you were out and about in Austin this weekend, you may have met someone from the outreach team of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.projectconnect.com/">Project Connect</a>, a multi-agency group working on mass transit options for the region. In an effort to promote a series of meetings regarding <a href="http://kut.org/post/project-connects-14-billion-proposal-austin-urban-rail">an urban rail proposal</a> that will likely end up before voters this fall, the outreach team was passing out flyers showing the proposed first rail line in Hyde Park.&nbsp;But those flyers don’t accurately show what that proposed line is, and now one neighborhood advocate is accusing Project Connect of misleading the public.</p><p>A few hundred Austinites got a flyer (above) from a Project Connect outreach team this weekend showing its overall long-term transit vision for the city. At the bottom right corner of the flyer, a big orange bubble screams, “Let’s Get Moving!” The flyer shows rail to the airport, rail along the major corridors of Lamar and Congress, and along the MoPac freeway. In essence, rail lines that have the potential to replace lots of cars on the road. The map is titled "Proposed First Line of Urban Rail." There is no legend indicating what the various routes depicted are.&nbsp;</p><p>But if you were to actually pass out an accurate map of the proposed first line that voters may decide on this fall – which in its latest iteration would run along East Riverside, through downtown and&nbsp;<span style="line-height: 1.5;">tunneling under and then paralleling a portion of&nbsp;</span><a href="http://www.capmetro.org/metrorail/" style="line-height: 1.5;">the existing&nbsp;MetroRail&nbsp;line</a>&nbsp;up to Highland Mall – it would actually look very different.</p><p> Tue, 10 Jun 2014 19:37:15 +0000 Terrence Henry 10570 at http://kut.org Why is Project Connect Handing Out This Inaccurate Urban Rail Map? New Carbon Rules Could Have Big Impact on Texas http://kut.org/post/new-carbon-rules-could-have-big-impact-texas <p style="margin-bottom: 15px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 16px; line-height: 24px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(68, 68, 68);">Big changes could be coming for Texas power plants. The Obama administration is announcing&nbsp;<a href="http://yosemite.epa.gov/opa/admpress.nsf/bd4379a92ceceeac8525735900400c27/5bb6d20668b9a18485257ceb00490c98!OpenDocument" style="color: rgb(23, 78, 130); -webkit-transition: all 0.2s ease-in-out; transition: all 0.2s ease-in-out; font-weight: bold;">new rules today</a>&nbsp;aimed at cutting carbon dioxide emissions from power plants – the chief culprit behind global warming.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 15px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 16px; line-height: 24px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(68, 68, 68);">The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) wants to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel power plants in the U.S. by 30 percent (from their 2005 levels) by 2030. That “is equal to the emissions from powering more than half the homes in the United States for one year,” according to the EPA. In Texas, that drop will need to be even higher: the state’s carbon emissions from the power sector will need to&nbsp;<a href="http://cleanpowerplanmaps.epa.gov/CleanPowerPlan/" style="color: rgb(23, 78, 130); -webkit-transition: all 0.2s ease-in-out; transition: all 0.2s ease-in-out; font-weight: bold;">fall 39 percent by 2030</a>&nbsp;under the proposal.</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/152463787&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin-bottom: 15px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 16px; line-height: 24px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(68, 68, 68);"> Mon, 02 Jun 2014 16:18:31 +0000 Terrence Henry 10525 at http://kut.org New Carbon Rules Could Have Big Impact on Texas Investigation: Disaster at West Fertilizer Plant Was 'Preventable' http://kut.org/post/investigation-disaster-west-fertilizer-plant-was-preventable <p><em><a href="http://stateimpact.npr.org/texas/2014/04/22/investigation-fire-and-explosion-at-west-fertilizer-plant-was-preventable/">From StateImpact&nbsp;Texas:</a></em></p><p>A year after a deadly explosion at a fertilizer plant in Texas, a federal agency is releasing a&nbsp;<a data-mce-="" href="http://www.csb.gov/assets/1/19/West_Preliminary_Findings.pdf" style="line-height: 1.5; color: rgb(96, 120, 144); margin: 0px; padding: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgb(153, 153, 153);">report</a>&nbsp;saying the disaster was preventable.</p><p style="font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); margin-bottom: 15px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; outline: rgb(0, 0, 0); vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">The&nbsp;<a data-mce-="" href="http://www.csb.gov/" style="line-height: 1.5; color: rgb(96, 120, 144); margin: 0px; padding: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgb(153, 153, 153);">Chemical Safety Board</a>, which investigates chemical accidents and issues recommendations to ensure public safety, is presenting its preliminary findings tonight in the town of West, Texas, where the fire and subsequent explosion last year took 15 lives, injured hundreds, and destroyed homes and schools.</p><p> Wed, 23 Apr 2014 13:12:40 +0000 Terrence Henry 10278 at http://kut.org Investigation: Disaster at West Fertilizer Plant Was 'Preventable' What's Been Done to Prevent Another West? http://kut.org/post/whats-been-done-prevent-another-west <p><em>WBUR's "Here and Now" aired this story today. <a href="http://kut.org/post/whats-being-done-prevent-another-fertilizer-plant-explosion">See more here.</a></em></p><p><a href="http://stateimpact.npr.org/texas/2014/04/17/whats-being-done-to-prevent-another-west/">From StateImpact&nbsp;Texas:&nbsp;</a></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">WEST, TX - Trucks and bulldozers are still working here, the site of an explosion a year ago today. A </span><a href="http://stateimpact.npr.org/texas/2013/04/22/after-west-fertilizer-explosion-concerns-over-safety-regulation-and-zoning/" style="line-height: 1.5;">deadly blast tore</a><span style="line-height: 1.5;"> through this small community, killing fifteen and injuring hundreds. Homes and schools were destroyed, with the damage estimated to be over a hundred million dollars.&nbsp;</span></p><p>There's a lone charred tree that still stands at the location of the blast, but other than that, the site is mostly empty. Crosses and memorials that read "West Strong" and "West is the Best" line the road.</p><p>The explosion at the West fertilizer plant was one of the worst industrial disasters in Texas history. So what's Texas doing to prevent it from happening again?</p><p>"Well, technically, nothing has been done," says state Rep. Joe Pickett (D-El Paso), chair of the House Homeland Security and Public Safety Committee. Pickett says since West happened <a href="http://stateimpact.npr.org/texas/2013/05/01/hearing-on-west-fertilizer-explosion-shows-lack-of-regulation-and-coordination/">near the end of the legislative session</a>, he didn't want to rush in any "knee-jerk" rules or regulations.<iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/145081521&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true" width="100%"></iframe></p><p> Thu, 17 Apr 2014 17:44:24 +0000 Terrence Henry 10240 at http://kut.org What's Been Done to Prevent Another West? Why It's So Damn Hard to Move the Taco Bell Tree http://kut.org/post/why-its-so-damn-hard-move-taco-bell-tree <p><strong><a href="http://stateimpact.npr.org/texas/2014/03/25/why-its-so-damn-hard-to-move-a-heritage-tree/">From StateImpact&nbsp;Texas:&nbsp;</a></strong></p><p>Back in the 1970s and '80s, it probably looked like something out of&nbsp;<a data-mce-="" href="http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0106677/" style="line-height: 1.5; color: rgb(96, 120, 144); margin: 0px; padding: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgb(153, 153, 153);">Dazed and Confused</a>. Teenagers pulling up in T-Birds, wind in their hair, to hang out in the parking lot of a Taco Bell. The sun would set in the Hill Country to the west, sending a glow through the branches of an old Live Oak tree. Today the Taco Bell and the teenagers are long gone, but the tree remains, affectionately known as the "<a data-mce-="" href="http://www.austinheritagetreefoundation.com/Taco_Bell_Tree.html" style="line-height: 1.5; color: rgb(96, 120, 144); margin: 0px; padding: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgb(153, 153, 153);">Taco Bell Tree</a>."</p><p style="font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); margin-bottom: 15px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; outline: rgb(0, 0, 0); vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">It's also now at an intersection best known for being a traffic nightmare –&nbsp;the Y at Oak Hill&nbsp;–&nbsp; where two highways intersect and a third road feeds into the jumble. In order to improve that intersection, the state embarked on a&nbsp;<a data-mce-="" href="http://www.austintexas.gov/edims/document.cfm?id=198583" style="line-height: 1.5; color: rgb(96, 120, 144); margin: 0px; padding: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgb(153, 153, 153);">temporary plan</a>&nbsp;to expand it that would help for the next five years, while something longer term is put into place. The plan included cutting down the Taco Bell Tree, which has been here long before drive-thrus (or even combustion engines).<em style="line-height: 1.5; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; outline: rgb(0, 0, 0); vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;">&nbsp;<a data-mce-="" href="http://www.slate.com/blogs/browbeat/2014/03/12/alright_alright_alright_matthew_mcconaughey_got_it_from_jim_morrison_watch.html" style="font-style: normal; line-height: 1.5; color: rgb(96, 120, 144); margin: 0px; padding: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgb(153, 153, 153);">All right, all right, all right.</a></em></p><p style="font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); margin-bottom: 15px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; outline: rgb(0, 0, 0); vertical-align: baseline; background-color: transparent;"><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/141343300&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true" width="100%"></iframe></p><p> Tue, 25 Mar 2014 17:53:24 +0000 Terrence Henry 10031 at http://kut.org Why It's So Damn Hard to Move the Taco Bell Tree Questions Still Surround Decades-Old Murders at Lake Waco http://kut.org/post/questions-still-surround-decades-old-murders-lake-waco <p>In 1982, a grisly triple homicide in Waco shook residents faith in their community. Three teenagers were killed, and local police struggled with the investigation. The murders were just the beginning of a story that spans decades and involves dozens of characters, many of which became obsessed with both the murders and how the case was prosecuted. Now a<a href="http://www.texasmonthly.com/story/investigating-the-lake-waco-murders"> new story</a> in&nbsp;<em>Texas Monthly</em> by Michael Hall raises troubling questions about how the state handles justice.</p><p>"If there's one thing for certain, it's that the Lake Waco murder case does stand on its own," Hall writes in the story, '<a href="http://www.texasmonthly.com/story/investigating-the-lake-waco-murders">Murders at the Lake</a>,' in the April issue of <em>Texas Monthly</em>.&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/140425407&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true" width="100%"></iframe></p><p> Thu, 20 Mar 2014 11:00:00 +0000 Terrence Henry 10002 at http://kut.org Questions Still Surround Decades-Old Murders at Lake Waco What Happens When a Local Business Opts Out of SXSW http://kut.org/post/what-happens-when-local-business-opts-out-sxsw <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Thousands of bands have come to town for </span>SXSW<span style="line-height: 1.5;">, and many of them are here thanks to one thing: brands. Doritos is reportedly <a href="http://www.forbes.com/sites/randalllane/2014/03/06/sxsws-death-by-doritos-with-an-assist-from-lady-gaga/">paying Lady Gaga millions</a> to do a show. Chevy is giving people <a href="http://kut.org/post/why-austins-restricting-uber-over-sxsw">free rides around town</a>. Toilet paper brand </span>Cottonelle<span style="line-height: 1.5;"> even has a "<a href="http://sxsw.com/film-interactive/news/2014/stop-cottonelle-refresh-lounge">refresh lounge</a>" at the festival this year. </span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">But what happens to local businesses that opt out of corporate freebies and VIP-only parties?&nbsp;</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">To find out, just head to Rainey Street, aka Corporate Party Central. But at the southern end of the street sits a bar that's proudly banner-free, with no velvet rope and no VIP&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">guestlists</span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">:&nbsp;</span><a href="http://craftprideaustin.com/" style="line-height: 1.5;">Craft Pride</a><span style="line-height: 1.5;">.</span><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/139465422&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true" width="100%"></iframe></p><p> Fri, 14 Mar 2014 13:38:24 +0000 Terrence Henry 9963 at http://kut.org What Happens When a Local Business Opts Out of SXSW Exploring the Science Behind Manmade Quakes in Texas http://kut.org/post/exploring-science-behind-manmade-quakes-texas <p style="margin-bottom: 15px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 16px; line-height: 24px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(68, 68, 68);"><a href="http://stateimpact.npr.org/texas/2014/02/18/exploring-the-science-behind-manmade-quakes-in-texas/">From StateImpact Texas:&nbsp;</a></p> Tue, 18 Feb 2014 15:34:52 +0000 Terrence Henry 9799 at http://kut.org Exploring the Science Behind Manmade Quakes in Texas Is Texas Ready to Get Kinky About Hemp? http://kut.org/post/texas-ready-get-kinky-about-hemp <p><a href="http://stateimpact.npr.org/texas/2014/02/12/is-texas-ready-to-get-kinky-about-hemp/">From StateImpact&nbsp;Texas:</a></p><p>He's run for office three times and lost. But here he is again, the novelist and troubadour that made a name for himself by turning country clichés into satiric social commentary, running for office. Richard "Kinky" Friedman (he got the nickname for his hair) is running as a Democrat for<a href="http://www.texasagriculture.gov/"> Agriculture Commissioner</a>, and he has a plan to make Texas "greener." He&nbsp;wants to make hemp and marijuana legal in Texas.</p><p>“I’m not a dope smoker, okay?” he says with a point of his trademark unlit cigar. “Except with Willie [Nelson]. More as a Texas&nbsp;etiquette&nbsp;kind of thing.” First, his argument for hemp, which is in the same family as marijuana but in its industrial form doesn’t have the medicinal or recreational uses of marijuana. Friedman argues that if cotton farmers in Texas were allowed to grow hemp instead, the trade-offs would be attractive.<iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/134358891&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true" width="100%"></iframe><img alt="" src="https://stateimpact.npr.org/texas/wp-includes/js/tinymce/plugins/wordpress/img/trans.gif" title="More..." /></p><p> Wed, 12 Feb 2014 16:25:37 +0000 Terrence Henry 9769 at http://kut.org Is Texas Ready to Get Kinky About Hemp? Meet the Answer to Texas' Air Conditioning Issues http://kut.org/post/meet-answer-texas-air-conditioning-issues <p><strong><a href="http://stateimpact.npr.org/texas/?p=34143">From StateImpact Texas:</a></strong></p><p>For years, Texas has struggled with how to solve its energy crunch: forecasts said not enough power plants were being built to meet the demands of a growing population and a booming state. But it turns out the state’s supplies are likely adequate. Despite all the growth in Texas, peak power demand <a href="http://www.ercot.com/content/news/presentations/2014/LoadForecastUpdate-Jan2014-FINAL.pdf">hasn’t increased as fast as expected</a>.</p><p>To understand why, it helps to start with those long, hot Texas summer afternoons just six months ago.<iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/132099820&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true" width="100%"></iframe></p><p> Thu, 30 Jan 2014 15:05:09 +0000 Terrence Henry 9678 at http://kut.org Meet the Answer to Texas' Air Conditioning Issues Town Hall Tonight Will Take on North Texas Earthquakes http://kut.org/post/town-hall-tonight-will-take-north-texas-earthquakes <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="350" marginheight="0" marginwidth="0" scrolling="no" src="https://www.google.com/maps/ms?msa=0&amp;msid=202293095463227667841.0004eae9ecc094d206461&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;t=m&amp;source=embed&amp;ll=32.949911,-97.580566&amp;spn=0.201669,0.292511&amp;z=11&amp;output=embed" width="560"></iframe><br /><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 16px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: 1.5; color: rgb(68, 68, 68);">Residents around </span><a href="http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/fishboat/fish/recreational/lakes/eagle_mountain/" style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 16px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: 1.5;">Eagle Mountain Lake</a><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 16px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: 1.5; color: rgb(68, 68, 68);"> outside of Fort Worth have had a shaky few months. Dozens of small earthquakes have struck the area out of the blue. The Dallas-Fort Worth area is not known as a place that’s prone to earthquakes. In fact, before 2007, there were no recorded earthquakes in the area. Since then, there have been hundreds.</span></p><div class="post-33439 post type-post status-publish format-standard hentry category-industry tag-earthquake tag-railroad-commission-of-texas clearfix post-content first last" id="post-33439" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 16px; line-height: 1.5; vertical-align: baseline; zoom: 1; color: rgb(68, 68, 68);"><p style="margin-bottom: 15px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 16px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: 1.5; vertical-align: baseline;"><a href="http://stateimpact.npr.org/texas/topic/earthquake/" style="color: rgb(23, 78, 130); -webkit-transition: all 0.2s ease-in-out; transition: all 0.2s ease-in-out; font-weight: bold;">Studies&nbsp;</a>of other swarms of earthquakes to the south in Johnson County and around the Dallas-Fort Worth airport have shown disposal wells to be the culprit, where wastewater from oil and gas drilling is injected deep underground. Inject enough wastewater, at the right pressure, and it can cause quiet faults to slip, resulting in earthquakes.</p> Thu, 02 Jan 2014 18:30:44 +0000 Terrence Henry 9473 at http://kut.org There’s a Solution to Power Outages During Texas Storms, But You Won’t Like It http://kut.org/post/there-s-solution-power-outages-during-texas-storms-you-won-t-it <p style="margin-bottom: 15px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 16px; line-height: 24px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(68, 68, 68);"><strong><a href="http://stateimpact.npr.org/texas/2013/12/16/theres-a-solution-to-power-outages-during-texas-storms-but-you-wont-like-it/">From StateImpact&nbsp;Texas:&nbsp;</a></strong></p><p style="margin-bottom: 15px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 16px; line-height: 24px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(68, 68, 68);">Against the backdrop of a debate over&nbsp;<a href="http://stateimpact.npr.org/texas/2013/12/03/the-4-billion-texas-electric-bill/" style="color: rgb(23, 78, 130); -webkit-transition: all 0.2s ease-in-out; transition: all 0.2s ease-in-out; font-weight: bold;">whether Texas has enough power generation</a>&nbsp;(i.e. power plants) to meet growing demand, two instances of large-scale outages in the past few weeks show a more common vulnerability: power lost to fallen or damaged power lines during storms.&nbsp;Could anything have been done to prevent the outages? The short answer is yes. But chances are you won’t like the full explanation.</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/125135578&amp;color=ff6600&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=true" width="100%"></iframe></p><p> Mon, 16 Dec 2013 19:21:29 +0000 Terrence Henry 9379 at http://kut.org There’s a Solution to Power Outages During Texas Storms, But You Won’t Like It Why In-N-Out Burger Pays More Than Other Fast Food Joints http://kut.org/post/why-n-out-burger-pays-more-other-fast-food-joints <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Austinites got a taste of California yesterday with the opening of the city’s <a href="http://hosted.where2getit.com/innout/newdesign/?form=locator_search&amp;addressline=Austin+TX+78705&amp;search=&amp;state=&amp;geoip=1">first In-N-Out Burger&nbsp;at 45th and Airport</a>. The drive thru is known for made-to-order burgers and an ordering system that allows you to micromanage your meal. (Want your bun extra toasted? <a href="http://aht.seriouseats.com/archives/2011/03/the-in-n-out-survival-guide-we-ate-every-single-item-on-the-secret-menu.html">Just ask</a>.)&nbsp;</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">In-N-Out Burger&nbsp;<a href="http://www.in-n-out.com/menu/food-quality.aspx">has no freezers.</a> No microwaves. No heat lamps. And In-N-Out has been quietly going against another trend in the low-wage, low-benefit fast food industry: they're paying their employees much more than the industry standard.&nbsp;</span></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;"><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/124670710&amp;color=ff6600&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=true" width="100%"></iframe></span></p><p> Fri, 13 Dec 2013 17:43:29 +0000 Terrence Henry 9366 at http://kut.org Why In-N-Out Burger Pays More Than Other Fast Food Joints As Texas Towns Shake, Regulators Sit Still http://kut.org/post/texas-towns-shake-regulators-sit-still <p><a href="http://stateimpact.npr.org/texas/2013/12/06/as-north-texas-shakes-railroad-commission-sits-still/"><strong style="line-height: 1.5;">From StateImpact Texas:</strong></a></p><h4><em>State Oil and Gas Regulator Says No Changes Needed After Latest Earthquake Swarm</em></h4><p>After twenty minor earthquakes in a month, residents in the small towns of Azle and Springtown outside of Fort Worth are understandably confused about why their once-stable region is now trembling on a near-daily basis.</p><p>Teachers in the Azle school district are taking a page from the California playbook and <a href="http://www.star-telegram.com/2013/12/03/v-print/5387727/another-earthquake-strikes-near.html">holding earthquake drills for students</a>. Inspectors are making regular visits to the earthen Eagle Mountain Lake dam, as well as others in the area, checking for damage. (So far they've found none.) And locals like Rebecca Williams are constantly looking at their own homes for damage. So far she's found cracks in her home, driveway and in a retaining wall in her backyard.</p><p>The quakes have been small, below the threshold that is known to cause significant damage. But they've unnerved residents like Williams, who moved out to Eagle Mountain Lake looking for some peace and quiet. "You can actually see my house rocking from side to side," Williams says. She was at home when the largest of the quakes (<a href="http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eventpage/usb000l2kc#summary">magnitude 3.6</a>) struck on the evening of November 19th. "I tried to get up and run downstairs," she says. "And for a moment, I couldn’t run, because the house was shaking so bad!”</p><p>So what's behind the tremors?&nbsp;</p><p> Fri, 06 Dec 2013 19:31:41 +0000 Terrence Henry 9322 at http://kut.org As Texas Towns Shake, Regulators Sit Still How Prop 6 Passed, and What’s Up Next for Water Projects in Texas http://kut.org/post/how-prop-6-passed-and-what-s-next-water-projects-texas <p style="margin-bottom: 15px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 16px; line-height: 24px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(68, 68, 68);">Texans passed a&nbsp;constitutional&nbsp;amendment Tuesday to jump-start financing for water projects in the state:&nbsp;<a href="http://stateimpact.npr.org/texas/2013/11/04/everything-you-need-to-know-about-proposition-6-texas-water-fund/" style="color: rgb(23, 78, 130); -webkit-transition: all 0.2s ease-in-out; transition: all 0.2s ease-in-out; font-weight: bold;">Proposition 6</a>, which would take $2 billion in surplus state money from the state’s Rainy Day Fund to start a water infrastructure loan program. The measure had widespread support from both sides of the aisle as well as business and environmental groups. With over half of precincts reporting, the measure is passing with&nbsp;<a href="https://team1.sos.state.tx.us/enr/results/nov05_167_state.htm" style="color: rgb(23, 78, 130); -webkit-transition: all 0.2s ease-in-out; transition: all 0.2s ease-in-out; font-weight: bold;">75 percent of the vote</a>&nbsp;and has been called by the&nbsp;<em style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-variant: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Associated Press</em>.</p><p style="margin-bottom: 15px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 16px; line-height: 24px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(68, 68, 68);">“I&nbsp;couldn’t be more proud of the members of the legislature who worked in a collaborative way on a very positive agenda for planning for our future water needs,” Speaker of the House Joe Straus, R-San Antonio, said at a rally celebrating the amendment’s passage Tuesday evening. “But the people of Texas today validated our good work with an overwhelming vote of support.”&nbsp;Some Libertarian and smaller environmental groups were&nbsp;<a href="http://stateimpact.npr.org/texas/2013/10/31/meet-the-unlikely-allies-behind-the-push-for-prop-6-texas-water-fund/" style="color: rgb(23, 78, 130); -webkit-transition: all 0.2s ease-in-out; transition: all 0.2s ease-in-out; font-weight: bold;">vocally against the measure</a>.</p><p> Wed, 06 Nov 2013 03:54:47 +0000 Terrence Henry 9104 at http://kut.org How Prop 6 Passed, and What’s Up Next for Water Projects in Texas