Higher Ed
2:00 pm
Sun June 7, 2015

Higher Ed: Extreme Learning Makeover

Credit Dawn Endico/flickr

A new haircut. Maybe some new clothes. What about gutting a house and rebuilding the whole thing? Those sound like pretty extreme makeovers. What about an extreme learning makeover? In this week's episode of KUT's podcast Higher Ed, KUT's Jennifer Stayton and Southwestern University President Dr. Ed Burger discuss ways to transform how we teach and learn.

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2016 Election
8:44 pm
Sat June 6, 2015

In Iowa, Perry Looks to Reintroduce Himself

Rick Perry begins a bike ride in front of the Hotel Pattee in Perry, IA
Ben Philpott

The first stop on the official Perry for President campaign was the same place he ended his last Iowa campaign. On the night before the caucus in early January 2012, Rick Perry and a couple hundred supporters gathered at the Hotel Pattee in Perry, Iowa. The enthusiastic crowd hoped they could still make a difference in a flagging campaign.

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Austin authors
10:00 am
Sat June 6, 2015

New Book Encourages Women to Embrace Aging With Humor, Drama.... and Maybe a Little Wine, too

Aging. We all do it. Most of us try to avoid it, or at least stave off the effects of it. But two Austin authors hope women will learn to savor the wisdom and benefits that can come with growing older.

Ruth Pennebaker wrote and Marian Henley illustrated Pucker Up! The Subversive Woman's Guide to Aging with Wit, Wine, Drama, Humor, Perspective, and the Occasional Good Cry. Listen for their tips and tools for enjoying all that is good about the golden years.

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2016 Presidential Campaign
12:21 pm
Fri June 5, 2015

Taking Stock of Perry's Announcement Launching His Second Presidential Run

Perry made his official announcement this week.
Ben Philpott/KUT News

Former Texas Governor Rick Perry has officially begun his second attempt at winning the Republican Presidential nomination. His long-awaited announcement came yesterday in North Texas. As his second White House bid begins, let’s take a look back at how yesterday’s announcement could impact his campaign going forward.

Number one: decor. It was absolutely the first thing you noticed when walking into the airplane hangar where Perry’s announcement was staged. Just behind the stage, taking up most of the hangar, was a C-130 transport plane – the same type of plane Perry flew in the Air Force. Standing in front of that plane, on stage with Perry, were military veterans from several different wars. Including Navy SEAL Marcus Luttrell, the author and subject of the book and film “Lone Survivor.”

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Texas Standard
11:46 am
Fri June 5, 2015

Is Texas the Center of the Universe? Neil deGrasse Tyson Says Yes, In a Way

nasahqphoto/flickr

Neil deGrasse Tyson may be the biggest celebrity astrophysicist working today. In addition to hosting the reboot of the TV series “Cosmos,” he is also active on Twitter, where he makes science jokes, ruminates on the universe, and offers up physics-related facts. Now, Tyson is taking his ideas on the road. He'll be appearing across Texas this month, and today, he spoke with Nathan Bernier about the upcoming tour.

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Austin City Council
10:56 am
Fri June 5, 2015

Council Adopts 6 Percent Homestead Exemption

Last night, the Austin City Council passed a six percent homestead tax exemption on a vote of 7-4.
flickr.com/gjmj

Despite the fact that views among City Council members run the gamut as far as implementing a homestead tax exemption, they opted in a 7-4 vote to meet in the middle early Friday morning, approving a 6 percent exemption for this year and expressing an intent to increase it to 20 percent over the course of four years.

Mayor Pro Tem Kathie Tovo and Council Members Greg Casar, Delia Garza and Ora Houston cast the dissenting votes.

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Two Guys on Your Head
10:23 am
Fri June 5, 2015

Process, Not Product: A Better Method For Teaching Science

Credit galleryhip.com

Nuclear energy. Penicillin. Lasers.

Science produces some pretty groundbreaking discoveries, but when we focus on the products, as opposed to the process, we miss a huge part of what makes science one of the most valuable resources we have as humans.

In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about some of the aspects of science education that could be improved upon, in order to ensure we have a public that's well-informed. 

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The Ticket
9:38 am
Fri June 5, 2015

The Ticket: Ben Carson and Ray Sullivan

This week on The Ticket: With former Texas Governor Rick Perry jumping into the GOP race, we talk with Opportunity and Freedom Super PAC co­-chair Ray Sullivan about Perry's chances in his second run, and we'll continue our review of presidential contenders with an analysis of the Ben Carson campaign on Stump Interrupted.

The Ticket, a weekly presidential podcast from KUT News and the Texas Tribune hosted by KUT's Ben Philpott and the Tribune's Jay Root, breaks down the week's campaign action and brings you interviews with people who make a living working on, covering or commenting on the political campaigns.

Austin
9:32 am
Fri June 5, 2015

Ready to Hit the Pool? You May Have to Wait.

Barton Springs, along with several other pools, aren't quite recovered from the Memorial Day flooding.
Audrey McGlinchy/flickr

School’s letting out for summer, and swimming pool season’s getting underway. But some of Austin’s pools aren’t ready for swimmers, at least not yet.

During last week’s floods, images circulated of Barton Springs Pool looking like a raging river. The water’s receded since then, but now, small islands of drying mud float atop murky, green water.

But there aren’t any swimmers. “Just a few ducks and some divers,” said Andrei Mellin, who was in town visiting from Cincinatti. He and his family showed up to Barton Springs, towels in hand, only to find out that the pool isn’t open.

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The Two-Way
4:28 am
Fri June 5, 2015

EPA Finds No Widespread Drinking Water Pollution From Fracking

Workers use perforating tools to create fractures in rock. An EPA study finds that "fracking" to reach and extract deep pockets of hydrocarbons has not caused widespread drinking water pollution.
Brennan Linsley AP

Originally published on Fri June 5, 2015 7:01 am

The Environmental Protection Agency says it has found no evidence that hydraulic fracturing — better known as fracking — has led to widespread pollution of drinking water. The oil industry and its backers welcome the long-awaited study, while environmental groups criticize it.

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2016 Election
2:10 pm
Thu June 4, 2015

'It's Time,' Perry Says in Announcing 2016 Candidacy

Rick Perry, criticizes the current administration as he announces his candidacy for the Republican nomination for president on June 4, 2015.
Bob Daemmrich/Texas Tribune

Emphasizing his humble roots and military service, former Gov. Rick Perry made official Thursday what he has been hinting at for some time: He's running for president in 2016. 

"It's time," he said to a few hundred flag-waving supporters. "It's time to create real jobs; to raise wages; to create opportunity for all; to give every citizen a stake in this country; to restore hope — real hope to forgotten Americans."

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Gender Divide
1:07 pm
Thu June 4, 2015

In Austin's All-Boys Middle School, Young Men Find, and Become, Role Models

Bryce Gable works out at track practice after a school day at Gus Garcia Young Men's Leadership Academy, an all-boys middle school.
Ilana Panich-Linsman/KUT News

Raising children isn’t easy, especially if you’re doing it on your own.

At Gus Garcia Young Men’s Leadership Academy, the new all-boys school in East Austin, many of the students are being raised by single moms or grandmas. Principal Sterlin McGruder recognizes that.

"I feel it's important [that] I’m in the cafeteria, I'm in the hallway, I'm in the classrooms, so that they can have a conversation with me," McGruder says. "They don’t have the male role model at home. They need that male role model who they can talk to. You can tell they're yearning."

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Texas Standard
12:34 pm
Thu June 4, 2015

Terrorism Gone Viral: House Committee Hearing on ISIS and Social Media

jacobfg/flickr

From Texas Standard

"Terrorism Gone Viral: The Attack in Garland, Texas and Beyond," was the title given to the discussion in the House Committee on Homeland Security. The committee is chaired by Texas Congressman Michael McCaul.

Federal officials wanted to use the attack on the Curtis Culwell Center to illustrate the militant group, the self proclaimed Islamic State's, use of social media to recruit westerners.

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2016 Presidential Election
7:05 am
Thu June 4, 2015

Rick Perry Makes It Official: He's Running for President, Again

Gov. Rick Perry on the House dais in his final speech to the Texas Legislature on Jan. 15, 2015.
Bob Daemmrich, Texas Tribune

Former Texas Governor Rick Perry has (as expected) declared he's pursuing the 2016 Republican presidential nomination. Perry announced first online this morning (in this web video and new website), ahead of his in-person announcement later in North Texas.

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Austin
2:37 pm
Wed June 3, 2015

Early-Morning Running Group Helps Homeless Get Back on Their Feet

'Back on My Feet' provides running gear for homeless participants in their thrice-weekly early-morning runs.
Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT News

Austin is a running- and jogging-friendly city. It also has a homeless population of about 2,000. An Austin non-profit group is combining the two to help people break the cycle of chronic homelessness.

Back on My Feet is a program that uses running as a starting point to help people who are homeless change the way they see themselves, as well as find jobs and housing. The program started in Philadelphia in 2007, and its Austin chapter began in 2013.

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Wayback Wednesday
2:04 pm
Wed June 3, 2015

Looking Back at Aqua Fest, One of Austin's Early Festivals

A young skier during the Austin Aqua Festival in the 1970s.
Texas Archive of the Moving Image

In light of the descending extreme sports — or "action" sports, if you're partial to that label — festival coming into town this week, today's Wayback Wednesday looks back at Austin's first sports-music hybrid festival, the Austin Aqua Festival. 

Founded by the city's chamber of commerce, the annual festival, which ran from 1962 to 1998, aimed to boost tourism during the slower summer months. As the years went on, Aqua Fest drew huge crowds (more than 200,000 at its peak in the '80s) and drew national acts and local favorites, like Dolly Parton and Willie Nelson.

But, it also enraged some communities along Lady Bird Lake, most notably Hispanic communities in East Austin, who protested noisy speedboat races near Festival Beach, and those in Bouldin Creek, who didn't like the idea of motorcycle races careening through their neighborhood. Ultimately, the fest ended in 1998 after years of declining attendance, but below is a look at the proto-X-Games, proto-ACL known as Aqua Fest.

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Memorial Day Floods
11:27 am
Wed June 3, 2015

Texas Employees Have One Month to Apply for Disaster Assistance Money

People who've lost work in Texas after the Memorial Day Floods could qualify for Disaster Unemployment Assistance through the Texas Workforce Commission.
Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT

In the roughly 13 years that Tom Keyser has owned Ino’z Brew & Chew in Wimberley, he’s been flooded three times, and last month’s flooding was the worst.

"This water level inside the building and in the restaurant itself was the highest it’s ever, ever been," he said. 

The restaurant got 18 inches of water in areas including the kitchen and main dining area, which meant Keyser and his partner had to close down the restaurant for five days. That was tough for him, his partner and their 35 employees.

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In Black America Podcast
11:26 am
Wed June 3, 2015

Homeownership and America's Financial Underclass: Flawed Premises, Broken Promises, New Prescription

A. Mechele Dickerson is a nationally recognized bankruptcy law scholar and a global media expert on consumer debt. She is the author of Homeownership and America's Financial Underclass: Flawed Premises, Broken Promises, New Prescriptions.

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with A. Mechele Dickerson, Law professor at the University of Texas School of Law, and author of ‘Homeownership and America's Financial Underclass: Flawed Premises, Broken Promises, New Prescriptions.

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Memorial Day Floods
8:13 am
Wed June 3, 2015

Attorney General Warns Texans in Disaster Zones Against Scammers

Residents of Hays, Harris and Van Zandt Counties may be eligible for help from the Federal Emergency Management Agency after the Memorial Day Floods.
Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon/KUT News

In May, Texas had the highest monthly rainfall total in its history, but the hundreds of people affected by flash flooding are finding out that they may not have had the right type of insurance coverage. The Insurance Council of Texas is warning Texans that a homeowner policy doesn’t cover everything.

"A lot of people think this homeowner policy is good for flooding. It’s not," says Mark Hanna, a spokesperson for the  Insurance Council of Texas. "You need to get a separate flood insurance policy. That’s going to protect you against any type of rising waters."

Meanwhile, residents of Hays, Harris and Van Zandt Counties may be eligible for help from the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Residents can register online at disasterassistance.gov.

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Affordable Care Act
5:08 pm
Tue June 2, 2015

More Texas Women, Hispanics Insured Under ACA, Report Suggests

A June report from the Episcopal Health Foundation and Rice University’s Baker Institute suggests the uninsured rates among Texas Hispanics and women have dropped the most since the implementation of the Affordable Care Act.
KUT News

Some Texans may have benefited more than others from the Affordable Care Act, according to research by the Episcopal Health Foundation and Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy.

Since the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, the rate of uninsured Hispanics has dropped 38 percent. As of March this year, less than a quarter of Hispanics still didn't have health insurance.

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